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Work–Family Conflict and Depression in Chinese Professional Women: the Mediating Roles of Job Satisfaction and Life Satisfaction

Abstract

This study examined the mediating effects of job satisfaction and life satisfaction on the relationship between work–family conflict and depression in professional women. A total of 443 professional women completed questionnaires that measured work–family conflict, job satisfaction, life satisfaction, and depression. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was adopted to test the mediating effect. Bootstrap methods were used to assess the magnitude of the direct and indirect effects. SEM showed that job and life satisfaction partially mediated the relationship between work–family conflict and depression. The results of the bootstrap estimation procedure and subsequent analyses indicated that the indirect effects of job and life satisfaction on the relationship between work–family conflict and depression were also significant. The final model shows a significant relationship between work–family conflict and depression through job and life satisfaction.

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Correspondence to Jiaxi Peng.

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Wang, Y., Peng, J. Work–Family Conflict and Depression in Chinese Professional Women: the Mediating Roles of Job Satisfaction and Life Satisfaction. Int J Ment Health Addiction 15, 394–406 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11469-017-9736-0

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Keywords

  • Depression
  • Job satisfaction
  • Life satisfaction
  • Professional women
  • Work–family conflict