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The Compulsive Online Shopping Scale (COSS): Development and Validation Using Panel Data

Abstract

The Internet is one of the most influential forms of mass media having revolutionized human behavior, with people spending more and more time online. However, excessive Internet use, which is also termed as “Internet Addiction”, can have negative consequences for an individual as well as the society in which they reside. This type of addiction is classified as behavioral addiction (DSM-5, American Psychiatric Association 2013). However, a group of American Psychiatric Association (APA) working members deemed insufficient research to consider additional behavioral addictions (e.g., compulsive buying) to be included in psychiatric nosology. Henceforth, one of the goals of this study is to shed light on what is considered “compulsive online shopping” to further support future DSM behavioral addiction classification modifications. The second goal of this study was to develop a compulsive online shopping scale (COSS) that is consistent with addiction criteria established in the DSM-5. And finally, we explored a few characteristic features related to compulsive online shoppers; both demographically and psychologically.

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Correspondence to Srikant Manchiraju.

Ethics declarations

All procedures followed were in accordance with the ethical standards of the responsible committee on human experimentation (institutional and national) and with the Helsinki Declaration of 1975, as revised in 2000 (5).

Conflict of Interest

Authors Srikant Manchiraju, Amrut Sadachar and Jessica L. Ridgway declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all the participants for being included in the study.

Appendix

Appendix

Table 3 The COSS scale items with reliabilities

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Manchiraju, S., Sadachar, A. & Ridgway, J.L. The Compulsive Online Shopping Scale (COSS): Development and Validation Using Panel Data. Int J Ment Health Addiction 15, 209–223 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11469-016-9662-6

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Keywords

  • Compulsive online shopping
  • Measurement scale
  • Demographics
  • Psychographics
  • Internet addiction