Advertisement

Awareness Training Program on Responsible Gambling for Casino Employees

  • Isabelle Giroux
  • Claude Boutin
  • Robert Ladouceur
  • Stella Lachance
  • Magali Dufour
Article

Abstract

Over the last years, several comprehensive training programs for problem gambling have been developed and implemented in various casinos around the world. However, the efficacy of these programs has rarely been assessed and evaluated scientifically. A workshop called Des gens qui font la différence (People Making a Difference) was developed to train casino employees about problem gambling and how to offer help to gamblers in crisis. Two thousand four hundred and thirty-two (2,432) employees of the three casinos in the province of Quebec, Canada were enrolled in these training sessions. The employees completed a self-administered questionnaire at the beginning and at the end of the session, and were also invited to participate in a 6-month follow-up. One-thousand six-hundred fifteen (1,615) employees of the three casinos agreed to be contacted by phone for the follow-up. Of this number, 789 answered the questionnaire, which constitutes a participation rate of 32%. The results showed that participants demonstrated a better understanding of the notions of chance and randomness, and of problem gambling. They were more convinced of their role in identifying gamblers in crisis and displayed a greater knowledge of the procedure that has been implemented to help gamblers. At the follow-up, results indicated that participants maintained a good understanding of the notion of randomness and remained convinced about the importance of receiving information about available help and resources. However, some notions about problem gambling and the procedure implemented to help gamblers in crisis were not well maintained. In conclusion, the awareness training session on responsible gambling allowed employees to increase their knowledge about gambling and improve their attitudes regarding gamblers. Since some important components that were taught—such as the established procedure to help gamblers—were not well assimilated, awareness training program planners in casinos need to schedule for additional information to be made available (refresher courses, posters, brochures, videos) to keep employees well informed.

Keywords

Responsible gambling Gaming employees training Prevention 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors wish to thank Annie Goulet, Cathy Savard and Richard Desmeules for their contributions to this study. This study was funded by the Fondation Mise sur toi de Loto-Québec and was carried out while the Centre québécois d’excellence pour la prévention et le traitement du jeu (Quebec centre for excellence in the prevention and treatment of gambling) was receiving research funds from the following organizations: Ontario Problem Gambling Research Council (OPGRC), Fonds Équipe Formation de Chercheurs et l'Aide à la Recherche, Conseil de Recherche Médicale du Canada, Fonds québécois de la recherche sur la société et la culture (FQRSC), Conseil de recherches en sciences humaines du Canada (CRSH), Régies des alcools, des courses et des jeux (RACJ), ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux du Québec (MSSS) (Quebec Ministry of Health and Social Services), Harrah’s Operating Funds, Loto-Québec and the Fondation Mise sur Toi de Loto-Québec. Isabelle Giroux, Claude Boutin and Magali Dufour received monetary compensation from the Fondation Mise sur toi for their work as a responsible gambling trainer and for their accommodation and travel expenses during training. Please address correspondence to Isabelle Giroux, School of Psychology, Université Laval, Quebec, Canada, G1K 7P4. E-mail: cqeptj@psy.ulaval.ca

References

  1. Blaszczynski, A., Ladouceur, R., & Shaffer, H. S. (2004). A science-based framework for responsible gambling: the reno model. Journal of Gambling Studies, 20, 301–317 doi: 10.1023/B:JOGS.0000040281.49444.e2.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Breen, H., Buultjens, J., & Hing, N. (2006). Implementing responsible gambling practices in a regional area. Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management, 13(1), 23–43 doi: 10.1375/jhtm.13.1.23.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Ladouceur, R., Boutin, C., Doucet, C., Dumont, M., Provencher, M., Giroux, I., et al. (2004). Awareness promotion about excessive gambling among video lottery retailers. Journal of Gambling Studies, 20, 181–185 doi: 10.1023/B:JOGS.0000022309.25027.25.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Mullally, M. (2005). A better balance: Nova Scotia’s first gaming strategy. Paper presented at the Discovery 2005 Conference, Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada, April 19.Google Scholar
  5. Sani, A., Carlevaro, T., & Ladouceur, R. (2005). Impact of a counselling session on at-risk casino patrons: a pilot study. Gambling Research: Journal of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Autralia), 17, 47–52.Google Scholar
  6. Shaffer, H. J., Vander Bilt, J., & Hall, M. N. (1999). Gambling, drinking, smoking and other health risk activities among casino employees. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 36(3), 365–378 doi: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0274(199909)36:3<365::AID-AJIM4>3.0.CO;2-I.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Skelton, Chad (2004). Knowing when to fold‘em: Problem Gamblers 1. The Netherlands has a solution. So does South Carolina. The Vancouver Sun, p.C3, November 20.Google Scholar
  8. Volberg, R. A. (2002). Gambling and problem gambling in Nevada. Northampton: Gemini Research Ltd.Google Scholar
  9. Ward, D. (2004). Responsible gaming information centre delivers help “where the gamblers are”. Newslinks, 15, SummerGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Isabelle Giroux
    • 1
  • Claude Boutin
    • 1
  • Robert Ladouceur
    • 1
  • Stella Lachance
    • 1
  • Magali Dufour
    • 2
  1. 1.Université LavalQuebecCanada
  2. 2.University of SherbrookeSherbrookeCanada

Personalised recommendations