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Gambling, Social Disorganisation and Deprivation

  • Lorna Dyall
Article

Abstract

The harms associated with the proliferation of gambling opportunities is increasingly being researched and documented as part of a public health approach to reduce gambling related harm in many countries. New Zealand has had a history of gambling for just under 200 years with the behaviour introduced by new settlers to New Zealand and the indigenous population around 1840. This paper proposes that gambling contributes to the social disorganisation and social deprivation of many communities and especially, those which are low income and are the residence of indigenous and ethnic minority populations. New Zealand has adopted a public health approach to addressing gambling related harm and this is supported through legislation. As part of a public health approach to reduce gambling related harm new questions are proposed to challenge those who have power in the licensing and regulation of gambling and the authority as where public health resources should be directed to remove gambling related harm. Maori the indigenous population of New Zealand is the focus this paper, but the questions proposed can be used by different groups in communities where gambling creates harm.

Keywords

Social disorganisation Social capital Social deprivation Indigenous Public health 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.HealthUniversity of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand

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