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Frontiers of Mechanical Engineering

, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 251–263 | Cite as

A review on ductile mode cutting of brittle materials

  • Elijah Kwabena Antwi
  • Kui Liu
  • Hao Wang
Open Access
Review Article
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Intelligent Manufacturing

Abstract

Brittle materials have been widely employed for industrial applications due to their excellent mechanical, optical, physical and chemical properties. But obtaining smooth and damage-free surface on brittle materials by traditional machining methods like grinding, lapping and polishing is very costly and extremely time consuming. Ductile mode cutting is a very promising way to achieve high quality and crack-free surfaces of brittle materials. Thus the study of ductile mode cutting of brittle materials has been attracting more and more efforts. This paper provides an overview of ductile mode cutting of brittle materials including ductile nature and plasticity of brittle materials, cutting mechanism, cutting characteristics, molecular dynamic simulation, critical undeformed chip thickness, brittle-ductile transition, subsurface damage, as well as a detailed discussion of ductile mode cutting enhancement. It is believed that ductile mode cutting of brittle materials could be achieved when both crack-free and no subsurface damage are obtained simultaneously.

Keywords

ductile mode cutting brittle materials critical undeformed chip thickness brittle-ductile transition subsurface damage molecular dynamic simulation 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors are grateful for the financial support from the National University of Singapore Start-up Grant and Singapore Ministry of Education Academic Research Fund Tier 1.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringNational University of SingaporeSingaporeSingapore
  2. 2.Singapore Institute of Manufacturing TechnologySingaporeSingapore

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