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Frontiers of Mechanical Engineering

, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 243–250 | Cite as

Experimental study of surface integrity and fatigue life in the face milling of inconel 718

  • Xiangyu Wang
  • Chuanzhen Huang
  • Bin Zou
  • Guoliang Liu
  • Hongtao Zhu
  • Jun Wang
Research Article

Abstract

The Inconel 718 alloy is widely used in the aerospace and power industries. The machining-induced surface integrity and fatigue life of this material are important factors for consideration due to high reliability and safety requirements. In this work, the milling of Inconel 718 was conducted at different cutting speeds and feed rates. Surface integrity and fatigue life were measured directly. The effects of cutting speed and feed rate on surface integrity and their further influences on fatigue life were analyzed. Within the chosen parameter range, the cutting speed barely affected the surface roughness, whereas the feed rate increased the surface roughness through the ideal residual height. The surface hardness increased as the cutting speed and feed rate increased. Tensile residual stress was observed on the machined surface, which showed improvement with the increasing feed rate. The cutting speed was not an influencing factor on fatigue life, but the feed rate affected fatigue life through the surface roughness. The high surface roughness resulting from the high feed rate could result in a high stress concentration factor and lead to a low fatigue life.

Keywords

roughness hardness residual stress microstructure fatigue life 

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Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51675312), a Project of Shandong Province Higher Educational Science and Technology Program (Grant No. J17KZ001), and the Key Laboratory of High-efficiency and Clean Mechanical Manufacture at Shandong University, Ministry of Education.

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Copyright information

© Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiangyu Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Chuanzhen Huang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bin Zou
    • 1
    • 2
  • Guoliang Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hongtao Zhu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jun Wang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Centre for Advanced Jet Engineering Technologies (CaJET), School of Mechanical EngineeringShandong UniversityJinanChina
  2. 2.Key Laboratory of High-efficiency and Clean Mechanical Manufacture (Shandong University)Ministry of EducationJinanChina
  3. 3.School of Mechanical and Manufacturing EngineeringUNSW AustraliaSydneyAustralia

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