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Frontiers of Mechanical Engineering

, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 264–291 | Cite as

Basic research on machinery fault diagnostics: Past, present, and future trends

  • Xuefeng Chen
  • Shibin Wang
  • Baijie Qiao
  • Qiang Chen
Open Access
Review Article

Abstract

Machinery fault diagnosis has progressed over the past decades with the evolution of machineries in terms of complexity and scale. High-value machineries require condition monitoring and fault diagnosis to guarantee their designed functions and performance throughout their lifetime. Research on machinery Fault diagnostics has grown rapidly in recent years. This paper attempts to summarize and review the recent R&D trends in the basic research field of machinery fault diagnosis in terms of four main aspects: Fault mechanism, sensor technique and signal acquisition, signal processing, and intelligent diagnostics. The review discusses the special contributions of Chinese scholars to machinery fault diagnostics. On the basis of the review of basic theory of machinery fault diagnosis and its practical applications in engineering, the paper concludes with a brief discussion on the future trends and challenges in machinery fault diagnosis.

Keywords

fault diagnosis fault mechanism feature extraction signal processing intelligent diagnostics 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was partly supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB057400), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51421004 and 51605366), and by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Xuefeng Chen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shibin Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Baijie Qiao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Qiang Chen
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems EngineeringXi’an Jiaotong UniversityXi’anChina
  2. 2.School of Mechanical EngineeringXi’an Jiaotong UniversityXi’anChina

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