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Frontiers of Mechanical Engineering

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 89–98 | Cite as

Advances in molecular dynamics simulation of ultra-precision machining of hard and brittle materials

  • Xiaoguang Guo
  • Qiang Li
  • Tao Liu
  • Renke Kang
  • Zhuji Jin
  • Dongming Guo
Review Article
  • 120 Downloads

Abstract

Hard and brittle materials, such as silicon, SiC, and optical glasses, are widely used in aerospace, military, integrated circuit, and other fields because of their excellent physical and chemical properties. However, these materials display poor machinability because of their hard and brittle properties. Damages such as surface micro-crack and subsurface damage often occur during machining of hard and brittle materials. Ultra-precision machining is widely used in processing hard and brittle materials to obtain nanoscale machining quality. However, the theoretical mechanism underlying this method remains unclear. This paper provides a review of present research on the molecular dynamics simulation of ultra-precision machining of hard and brittle materials. The future trends in this field are also discussed.

Keywords

MD simulation ultra-precision machining hard and brittle materials machining mechanism review 

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Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to acknowledge the financial support from the National Natural Science of China (General Program) (Grant No. 51575083), the Major Research plan of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91323302), the Science Fund for Creative Research Groups (Grant No. 51621064), and the Young Scientists Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51505063).

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Copyright information

© Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiaoguang Guo
    • 1
  • Qiang Li
    • 1
  • Tao Liu
    • 1
  • Renke Kang
    • 1
  • Zhuji Jin
    • 1
  • Dongming Guo
    • 1
  1. 1.Key Laboratory for Precision & Non-traditional Machining of Ministry of EducationDalian University of TechnologyDalianChina

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