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FEM-based strain analysis study for multilayer sheet forming process

Abstract

Fiber metal laminates have many advantages over traditional laminates (e.g., any type of fiber and resin material can be placed anywhere between the metallic layers without risk of failure of the composite fabric sheets). Furthermore, the process requirements to strictly control the temperature and punch force in fiber metal laminates are also less stringent than those in traditional laminates. To further explore the novel method, this study conducts a finite element method-based (FEM-based) strain analysis on multilayer blanks by using the 3A method. Different forming modes such as wrinkling and fracture are discussed by using experimental and numerical studies. Hydroforming is used for multilayer forming. The Barlat 2000 yield criteria and DYNAFORM/LS-DYNA are used for the simulations. Optimal process parameters are determined on the basis of fixed die-binder gap and variable cavity pressure. The results of this study will enhance the knowledge on the mechanics of multilayer structures formed by using the 3A method and expand its commercial applications.

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Correspondence to Rongjing Zhang.

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Zhang, R., Lang, L. & Zafar, R. FEM-based strain analysis study for multilayer sheet forming process. Front. Mech. Eng. 10, 373–379 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11465-015-0371-9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11465-015-0371-9

Keywords

  • finite element method (FEM)
  • strain analysis
  • multilayer sheet forming