Journal of Geographical Sciences

, Volume 28, Issue 6, pp 791–801 | Cite as

Spatial patterns and environmental factors influencing leaf carbon content in the forests and shrublands of China

  • Hang Zhao
  • Li Xu
  • Qiufeng Wang
  • Jing Tian
  • Xuli Tang
  • Zhiyao Tang
  • Zongqiang Xie
  • Nianpeng He
  • Guirui Yu
Article
  • 8 Downloads

Abstract

Leaf carbon content (LCC) is widely used as an important parameter in estimating ecosystem carbon (C) storage, as well as for investigating the adaptation strategies of vegetation to their environment at a large scale. In this study, we used a dataset collected from forests (5119 plots) and shrublands (2564 plots) in China, 2011–2015. The plots were sampled following a consistent protocol, and we used the data to explore the spatial patterns of LCC at three scales: plot scale, eco-region scale (n = 24), and eco-region scale (n = 8). The average LCC of forests and shrublands combined was 45.3%, with the LCC of forests (45.5%) being slightly higher than that of shrublands (44.9%). Forest LCC ranged from 40.2% to 51.2% throughout the 24 eco-regions, while that of shrublands ranged from 35% to 50.1%. Forest LCC decreased with increasing latitude and longitude, whereas shrubland LCC decreased with increasing latitude, but increased with increasing longitude. The LCC increased, to some extent, with increasing temperature and precipitation. These results demonstrate the spatial patterns of LCC in the forests and shrublands at different scales based on field-measured data, providing a reference (or standard) for estimating carbon storage in vegetation at a regional scale.

Keywords

carbon storage eco-regions foliar carbon shrubs stoichiometry China 

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Copyright information

© Institute of Geographic Science and Natural Resources Research (IGSNRR), Science China Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hang Zhao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Li Xu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Qiufeng Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jing Tian
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xuli Tang
    • 3
  • Zhiyao Tang
    • 4
  • Zongqiang Xie
    • 5
  • Nianpeng He
    • 1
    • 2
  • Guirui Yu
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Ecosystem Network Observation and Modeling, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources ResearchCASBeijingChina
  2. 2.University of Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina
  3. 3.South China Botanical GardenCASGuangzhouChina
  4. 4.Department of Ecology, College of Urban and Environmental SciencesPeking UniversityBeijingChina
  5. 5.State Key Laboratory of Vegetation and Environmental Change, Institute of BotanyCASBeijingChina

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