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Discussion of “The relation between dilatancy, effective stress and dispersive pressure in granular avalanches” by P. Bartelt and O. Buser (DOI: 10.1007/s11440-016-0463-7)

Abstract

A paper recently published by Bartelt and Buser (hereafter identified as “the authors”) aims to clarify relationships between granular dilatancy and dispersive pressure and to question the effective stress principle and its application to shallow granular avalanches (Bartelt and Buser in Act Geotech 11:549–557, 2). The paper also criticizes our own recent work, which utilizes the concepts of evolving dilatancy and effective stress to model the initiation and dynamics of water-saturated landslides and debris flows. Here we first explain why we largely agree with the authors’ views of dilatancy and dispersive pressure as they apply to depth-integrated granular avalanche models, and why we disagree with their views of effective stress and pore-fluid pressure. We conclude by explaining why the authors’ characterization of our recently developed D-Claw model is inaccurate.

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Correspondence to Richard M. Iverson.

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Iverson, R.M., George, D.L. Discussion of “The relation between dilatancy, effective stress and dispersive pressure in granular avalanches” by P. Bartelt and O. Buser (DOI: 10.1007/s11440-016-0463-7). Acta Geotech. 11, 1465–1468 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11440-016-0502-4

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Keywords

  • D-Claw
  • Debris flow
  • Dilatancy
  • Dispersive pressure
  • Effective stress
  • Landslide