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The interaction between cognition and emotion

Abstract

Cognition and emotion have long been thought of as independent systems. However, recent research in the cognitive and neurobiological sciences has shown that the relationship between cognition and emotion is more interdependent than separate. Based on evidence from behavioral and neuroscientific research, researchers have realized that it is necessary to propose a new conceptual framework to describe the relationship between cognition and emotion. In this article, recent research from behavioral, neuroscientific and developmental research on the interaction between cognition and emotion is summarized, and how the interaction of cognition and emotion might affect computer science and artificial intelligence is discussed. It especially focuses on the implications for affective computing.

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Supported by the National Key Basic Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2006CB303101), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 60433030, 90820305, and 30700233), and Young Scientists Fund, Institute of Psychology of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant Nos. 07CX132013 and 07CX142014)

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Liu, Y., Fu, Q. & Fu, X. The interaction between cognition and emotion. Chin. Sci. Bull. 54, 4102 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11434-009-0632-2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11434-009-0632-2

Keywords

  • emotion
  • cognition
  • interaction
  • affective computing