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Chinese Science Bulletin

, Volume 51, Supplement 2, pp 136–142 | Cite as

Main seagrass beds and threats to their habitats in the coastal sea of South China

  • Huang Xiaoping Email author
  • Huang Liangmin 
  • Li Yinghong 
  • Xu Zhanzhou 
  • Fong C. W. 
  • Huang Daojian 
  • Han Qiuying 
  • Huang Hui 
  • Tan Yehui 
  • Liu Sheng 
Article

Abstract

The distribution, species, biomass, productivity of main seagrasses and their suffered main threats are introduced and discussed in this paper based on the field surveys in the offshore areas of Guangdong, Guangxi and Hainan provinces. The seagrass beds distributed mainly in Liusha Bay, Donghai Island and Hailing Island of Guangdong Province; Hepu and Pearl Bay of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region; Li’an Bay, Xincun Bay, Longwan Bay and Sanya Bay of Hainan Province and so on. The total area of seagrass beds in the coastal sea of South China is about 2400 ha. There are about 8 species, such as Halophila ovalis, Halodule uninervis, Halophila beccarii, Zostera japonica, Enhalus acoroides, Thalassia hemperichii, Ruppia martime and Cymodocea rotundata. These seagrasses have high biomass and productivity. However, they are subjected to some threats resulting from artificial and natural factors, especially anthropogenic causes, such as culture of shrimps and fishes, shellfish collection, fishing by means of poisons, electric power and explosives as well as trawling, artificial pollution, dredging channels, and typhoons natural disaster.

Keywords

seagrass distribution ecological character threats South China 

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Copyright information

© Science in China Press 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Huang Xiaoping 
    • 1
    Email author
  • Huang Liangmin 
    • 1
  • Li Yinghong 
    • 1
  • Xu Zhanzhou 
    • 1
  • Fong C. W. 
    • 2
  • Huang Daojian 
    • 1
  • Han Qiuying 
    • 1
  • Huang Hui 
    • 1
  • Tan Yehui 
    • 1
  • Liu Sheng 
    • 1
  1. 1.LED, South China Sea Institute of OceanologyChinese Academy of SciencesGuangzhouChina
  2. 2.Environmental Resource Management Company of Hong KongHong KongChina

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