A concise tutorial on human motion tracking and recognition with Microsoft Kinect

Abstract

This paper provides a concise tutorial on the Microsoft Kinect technology and the state of art research on human motion tracking and recognition with Microsoft Kinect. A pre-requisite for human motion recognition is feature extraction. There are two types of feature extraction methods: skeleton joint based, and depth/color image based. Given a set of feature vectors, a motion could be recognized using machine learning, direct comparison, or rule-based methods. We also outline future research directions on the Kinect technology.

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Correspondence to Wenbing Zhao.

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Zhao, W. A concise tutorial on human motion tracking and recognition with Microsoft Kinect. Sci. China Inf. Sci. 59, 93101 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11432-016-5604-y

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Keywords

  • Microsoft Kinect
  • depth camera
  • human motion tracking and recognition
  • machine learning