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Science China Technological Sciences

, Volume 61, Issue 4, pp 496–505 | Cite as

Molten steel yield optimization of a converter based on constructal theory

  • LinGen Chen
  • Xiong Liu
  • HuiJun Feng
  • YanLin Ge
  • ZhiHui Xie
Article

Abstract

Constructal theory is introduced into the molten steel yield maximization of a converter in this paper. For the specific total cost of materials, generalized constructal optimization of a converter steel-making process is performed. The optimal cost distribution of materials is obtained, and is also called as “generalized optimal construct”. The effects of the hot metal composition contents, hot metal temperature, slag basicity and ratio of the waste steel price to the sinter ore price on the optimization results are analyzed. The results show that the molten steel yield after optimization is increased by 5.48% compared with that before optimization when sinter ore and waste steel are taken as the coolants, and the molten steel yield is increased by 6.84% when only the sinter ore is taken as the coolant. It means that taking sinter ore as coolant can improve the economic performance of the converter steelmaking process. Decreasing the contents of the silicon, phosphorus and manganese in the hot metal can increase the molten steel yield. The change of slag basicity affects the molten steel yield a little.

Keywords

converter molten steel yield charge composition constructal theory generalized thermodynamic optimization 

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Copyright information

© Science China Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • LinGen Chen
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Xiong Liu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • HuiJun Feng
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • YanLin Ge
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • ZhiHui Xie
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Thermal Science and Power EngineeringNaval University of EngineeringWuhanChina
  2. 2.Military Key Laboratory for Naval Ship Power EngineeringNaval University of EngineeringWuhanChina
  3. 3.College of Power EngineeringNaval University of EngineeringWuhanChina

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