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Science China Earth Sciences

, Volume 61, Issue 8, pp 1136–1147 | Cite as

Fluctuations in the tidal limit of the Yangtze River estuary in the last decade

  • Shengyu Shi
  • Heqin Cheng
  • Xiaona Xuan
  • Fangxi Hu
  • Xiaoting Yuan
  • Yuehua Jiang
  • Quanping Zhou
Research Paper
  • 32 Downloads

Abstract

The tidal limit is the key interface indicating whether water levels will be affected by tidal waves, which is of great significance to navigation safety and regional flood control. Due to limitations in research methods, recent changes in the Yangtze River tidal limit, caused by sea level rise and large-scale engineering projects, urgently need to be studied. In this study, spectrum analysis was undertaken on measured water level data from downstream Yangtze River hydrological stations from 2007 to 2016. The bounds of the tidal limit were identified through comparisons between the spectra and red noise curves, and the fluctuation range and characteristics were summarized. The results showed that: (1) During the extremely dry period, when the flow rate at Jiujiang station was about 8440 m3 s−1, the tidal limit was near Jiujiang; whereas during the flood season, when the flow rate at Jiujiang station was about 66700 m3 s−1, the tidal limit was between Zongyang Sluice and Chikou station. (2) From the upper to lower reach, the effect of the Jiujiang flow rate on the tidal limit weakens, while the effect of the Nanjing tidal range increases. The tidal limit fluctuates under similar flow rates and tidal ranges, and the fluctuation range increases with increasing flow rate and decreasing tidal range. (3) With the continued influence of rising sea levels and construction in river basin estuaries, the tidal limit may move further upstream.

Keywords

Yangtze River estuary Tidal limit Extreme flow Fluctuation characteristics Spectrum analysis 

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Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51761135023 & 41476075) and the China Geological Survey Nanjing Center Project (Grant No. DD20170246).

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Copyright information

© Science China Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shengyu Shi
    • 1
  • Heqin Cheng
    • 1
  • Xiaona Xuan
    • 2
  • Fangxi Hu
    • 1
  • Xiaoting Yuan
    • 1
  • Yuehua Jiang
    • 3
  • Quanping Zhou
    • 3
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Estuarine and Coastal ResearchEast China Normal UniversityShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Key Laboratory of Geo-information Science of Ministry of EducationEast China Normal UniversityShanghaiChina
  3. 3.Nanjing Center, China Geological SurveyNanjingChina

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