ZIKA virus isolated from mosquitoes: a field and laboratory investigation in China, 2016

  • Shihong Fu
  • Song Song
  • Hong Liu
  • Yuanyuan Li
  • Xiaolong Li
  • Xiaoyan Gao
  • Ziqian Xu
  • Guoping Liu
  • Dingming Wang
  • Zhenzao Tian
  • Jingzhu Zhou
  • Ying He
  • Wenwen Lei
  • Huanyu Wang
  • Bin Wang
  • Xiaoqing Lu
  • Guodong Liang
Research Paper SPECIAL TOPIC: Emerging and re-emerging viruses

Abstract

A field investigation of arboviruses was conducted in Dejiang, Guizhou Province in the summer of 2016. A total of 8,795 mosquitoes, belonging to four species of three genera, and 1,300 midges were collected. The mosquito samples were identified on site according to their morphology, and the pooled samples were ground and centrifuged in the laboratory. The supernatant was incubated with mosquito tissue culture cells (C6/36) and mammalian cells (BHK-21) for virus isolation. The results indicated that 40% (3,540/8,795) were Anopheles sinensis, 30% (2,700/8,795) were Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus, and 29% (2,530/8,795) were Armigeres subbalbeatus. Furthermore, a total of eight virus isolates were obtained, and genome sequencing revealed two Zika viruses (ZIKVs) isolated from Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus and Armigeres subbalbeatus, respectively; three Japanese encephalitis viruses (JEVs) isolated from Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus; two Banna viruses (BAVs) isolated from Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus and Anopheles sinensis, respectively; and one densovirus (DNV) isolated from Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus. The ZIKVs isolated from the Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus and Armigeres subbalbeatus mosquitoes represent the first ZIKV isolates in mainland China. This discovery presents new challenges for the prevention and control of ZIKV in China, and prompts international cooperation on this global issue.

Keywords

arbovirus surveillance mosquito-borne arbovirus Japanese encephalitis virus Zika virus 

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Copyright information

© Science China Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shihong Fu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Song Song
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Hong Liu
    • 4
  • Yuanyuan Li
    • 1
    • 2
    • 5
  • Xiaolong Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiaoyan Gao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ziqian Xu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Guoping Liu
    • 6
  • Dingming Wang
    • 7
  • Zhenzao Tian
    • 7
  • Jingzhu Zhou
    • 7
  • Ying He
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wenwen Lei
    • 1
    • 2
  • Huanyu Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bin Wang
    • 3
  • Xiaoqing Lu
    • 3
  • Guodong Liang
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, National Institute for Viral Disease Control and PreventionChinese Center for Disease Control and PreventionBeijingChina
  2. 2.Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious DiseasesHangzhouChina
  3. 3.Qingdao UniversityQingdaoChina
  4. 4.Shandong Provincial Research Center for Bioinformatic Engineering and Technique, School of Life SciencesShandong University of TechnologyZiboChina
  5. 5.National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of HealthWHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical DieasesShanghaiChina
  6. 6.Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Shenyang CommandShenyangChina
  7. 7.Guizhou Province Center for Disease Control and PreventionGuiyangChina

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