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Biomechanism of impact resistance in the woodpecker’s head and its application

Abstract

The woodpecker does not suffer head/eye impact injuries while drumming on a tree trunk with high acceleration (more than 1000×g) and high frequency. The mechanism that protects the woodpecker’s head has aroused the interest of ornithologists, biologists and scientists in the areas of mechanical engineering, material science and electronics engineering. This article reviews the literature on the biomechanisms and materials responsible for protecting the woodpecker from head impact injury and their applications in engineering and human protection.

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Correspondence to YuBo Fan.

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Wang, L., Lu, S., Liu, X. et al. Biomechanism of impact resistance in the woodpecker’s head and its application. Sci. China Life Sci. 56, 715–719 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11427-013-4523-z

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11427-013-4523-z

Keywords

  • review
  • biomechanics
  • woodpecker
  • head injury
  • application