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The role of hardiness in securities practitioners' web-based continuing learning: Internet self-efficacy as a mediator

Abstract

Due to the rapid changes in global economic environments, enterprises have to continually enhance their business competitiveness. To improve business, planning educational training has been regarded as a channel to educate outstanding employees. Recently, most of the companies in the securities industry in Taiwan have adopted web-based educational training as a form of employee training. However, low e-learning acceptance on the part of employees is the essential obstacle when enterprises attempt to promote web-based continuing learning. Previous studies have shown that hardiness and Internet self-efficacy may be important factors that influence whether an individual will continue with web-based learning when facing pressure. Securities practitioners are required to deal with high pressure and persist in enhancing their professional knowledge in their working environment; therefore, continuing learning is crucial to maintaining the quality of professional service. The present study recruited securities practitioners as the research participants, and examined the effects of hardiness and Internet self-efficacy on their attitudes towards web-based learning when they were participating in web-based learning. The findings revealed that securities practitioners’ hardiness and Internet self-efficacy both had direct positive effects on their attitudes towards web-based continuing learning. Meanwhile, their Internet self-efficacy had a mediating effect on the relationships between hardiness and attitudes towards web-based continuing learning.

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Acknowledgements

This study is supported in part by the Ministry of Science and Technology of the Republic of China under Contract Numbers MOST-109-2511-H-011-002-MY3, MOST-108-2511-H-011-005-MY3, and MOST-109-2511-H-152 -004 -MY2.

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Correspondence to Chiu-Lin Lai.

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The participants were protected by hiding their personal information during the research process. They knew that the participation was voluntary, and they could retreat at any time. There is no potential conflict of interest in this study. The data can be obtained by sending request e-mails to the corresponding author. The authors would like to declare that there is no conflict of interest in this study.

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Tu, YF., Lai, CL., Hwang, GJ. et al. The role of hardiness in securities practitioners' web-based continuing learning: Internet self-efficacy as a mediator. Education Tech Research Dev 69, 2547–2569 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11423-021-10038-z

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Keywords

  • Hardiness
  • Internet self-efficacy
  • Attitudes towards web-based continuing learning
  • Web-based learning
  • Securities practitioners