East Africa and China faculty use of information and communication technology tools: a descriptive and comparative analysis

Abstract

This study aims to determine the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) tools utilized by university faculties in East Africa and China, and to explore the connections allying instructors' perceptions over technology use and technology applications. A cross-sectional survey design questionnaire gathering information on the use of and attitudes towards technology applications was sent to five East African universities, and six Chinese universities. Respectively, data from 305 and 268 faculty members were collected, and analyzed using Technology Acceptance Modeling (TAM) combined with empirical and computational statistics. The results analysis found that only 19% of East African faculties taught part or all of an online course as compared to 69% of Chinese faculties. East Africa faculties use western social media much more than China faculties. However, China faculties use local social media more often. Findings from the relationships' path analysis reveal that for East Africa, System is the only variable that establishes a significant relationship with Actual technology Use. Ease of Use is closely related to Perceived Value, while Perceived Value is significantly related to Attitude towards technology. For China, System is the only variable that establishes a significant relationship with the Actual technology Use. Moreover, we find a wider relationship allying System Use and Actual technology tools Use for Chinese faculties indicating that they have more ICT access opportunities, thus their experience of using technology tools is more than that of East African faculties.

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Availability of data and materials

The datasets used and/or analyses during the current study are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.

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All authors contributed equally in conceptualization of the paper, the interpretation of the results, the development of the manuscript and the proofreading before the final submission.

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Correspondence to Sylvestre Munyengabe.

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Munyengabe, S., Niyigena, J.P., Mukamusoni, D. et al. East Africa and China faculty use of information and communication technology tools: a descriptive and comparative analysis. Education Tech Research Dev 69, 1773–1797 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11423-021-10012-9

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Keywords

  • East Africa Universities
  • China Universities
  • Faculty Technology use
  • ICT
  • EAC
  • East African Community