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Technology-based interventions for children with reading difficulties: a literature review from 2010 to 2020

Abstract

Technology-based interventions have been used to improve reading skills for students with reading difficulties. Thus, many literature reviews and meta-analyses have investigated the effectiveness of this type of intervention; however, constant changes in the technology field make it important to review the most recent studies and how these studies were implemented to improve reading skills for students who performed below their peers. This literature review synthesizes the most recent published studies on technology-based interventions for children with reading difficulties. Forty-five research-based studies published from 2010 to 2020 were reviewed and synthesized. The studies were categorized by the five reading skills as reported by the National Reading Panel (National Reading Panel, Teaching children to read: an evidence-based assessment of the scientific research literature on reading and its implications for reading instruction, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Washington, DC, 2000). Descriptions of the studies’ characteristics and interventions as well as an analytical review were provided. The majority of technology-based interventions targeted fluency skills and used computer programs, while vocabulary skills and tablet-based interventions were the least-targeted skills and tools. Most of the studies introduced intervention as independent practice, then as small groups, and then as one-to-one interventions.

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Table 2 Summary of studies

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Alqahtani, S.S. Technology-based interventions for children with reading difficulties: a literature review from 2010 to 2020. Education Tech Research Dev 68, 3495–3525 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11423-020-09859-1

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Keywords

  • Technology-based
  • Reading interventions
  • Reading difficulties
  • Literature review