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Process over product: the next evolution of our quest for technology integration

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the next evolution of our quest for technology integration, one that moves away from the product of teacher decision making (i.e., the type of use) towards their process of decision making. After presenting a brief history of our field’s quest, we bring together three ideas about teacher decision making with technology that have emerged through the research: technology integration is (1) value driven, (2) embedded in a dynamic system, and (3) a product of a teacher’s perception of what is possible. We then combine these ideas into a model of teacher decision making with technology that reflects how a teacher decides to integrate technology within a dynamic system. Implications for teacher beliefs research, professional development, and technology integration practice are discussed.

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Kopcha, T.J., Neumann, K.L., Ottenbreit-Leftwich, A. et al. Process over product: the next evolution of our quest for technology integration. Education Tech Research Dev 68, 729–749 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11423-020-09735-y

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Keywords

  • Technology integration
  • Dynamic systems
  • Teacher technology use
  • Teacher beliefs
  • Teacher decision making