A study of learning and motivation in a new media enriched environment for middle school science

Abstract

This study examines middle school students’ learning and motivation as they engaged in a new media enriched problem-based learning (PBL) environment for middle school science. Using a mixed-method design with both quantitative and qualitative data, we investigated the effect of a new media environment on sixth graders’ science learning, their motivation, and the relationship between students’ motivation and their science learning. The analysis of the results showed that: Students significantly increased their science knowledge from pretest to posttest after using the PBL program, they were motivated and enjoyed the experience, and a significant positive relationship was found between students’ motivation scores and their science knowledge posttest scores. Findings were discussed within the research framework.

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Correspondence to Min Liu.

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Liu, M., Horton, L., Olmanson, J. et al. A study of learning and motivation in a new media enriched environment for middle school science. Education Tech Research Dev 59, 249–265 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11423-011-9192-7

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Keywords

  • Motivation
  • Engagement
  • New media technology
  • Problem-based learning
  • Middle school science