Toward a place-based learning progression for haze pollution in the northern region of Thailand

Abstract

Haze pollution has been an annual environmental problem in the northern region of Thailand. The main causes include agricultural burning and wildfires that are enhanced by the high atmospheric pressure in a geographical plain encircled by mountains. Attempts have been made to address this problem, and place-based education is seen as crucial in this effort. Students are expected to understand and to engage in efforts to solve this problem in their living place. This research aims at developing a place-based learning progression on haze pollution for secondary students (grade 7–12) in Thailand. Fifty-five students in the seventh and 10th grades completed an open-ended questionnaire on haze pollution. The questions addressed the causes, processes, effects, and solutions. Subsequently, 17 students from the seventh through the 12th grades participated in semi-structured interviews, which required the use of abductive reasoning to offer explanations for the seasonal peak in haze in their region. Student responses were analyzed through an iterative process to determine their knowledge of the issue. The results provided data to develop a learning progression for haze pollution in the region, which can facilitate the design of a place-based curriculum and instruction on this topic.

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Ladachart, L., Poothawee, M. & Ladachart, L. Toward a place-based learning progression for haze pollution in the northern region of Thailand. Cult Stud of Sci Educ (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11422-020-09981-9

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Keywords

  • Environmental education
  • Haze pollution
  • Learning progression
  • Place-based education