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Indigenous knowledge, indigenous scholars, and narrating scientific selves: “to produce a human being”

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References

  1. Bohm, D. (1980). Wholeness and the implicate order. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.

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  2. Deloria, V. (1994). God is red: A native view of religion. Golden Co: Fulcrum Publishing.

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Correspondence to Michael Marker.

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This paper responds to issues raised in Robert Bechtel’s Oral narratives: reconceptualising the turbulence between Indigenous perspectives and Eurocentric scientific views.

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Marker, M. Indigenous knowledge, indigenous scholars, and narrating scientific selves: “to produce a human being”. Cult Stud of Sci Educ 11, 477–480 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11422-015-9660-1

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Keywords

  • Science Teacher
  • Indigenous Knowledge
  • Science Curriculum
  • Indigenous Knowledge System
  • Knowledge Holder