The Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled, Entering the Twentieth Century, ca. 1900 to 1912

Abstract

The continuing story of Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) from its origin in 1863 as the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled (R&C) on lower Second Avenue in New York saw expansion at its second site. A new 200-bed hospital was constructed and opened in 1870 on the corner of 42nd street and Lexington Avenue. Converted by the second surgeon-in-chief, Virgil P. Gibney, M.D., from a 28-bed home for the incurables to a modern orthopedic and surgical hospital with outstanding professional staff, the R&C emerged into the 20th Century as a unique treatment center for disabled children and adults and a foremost training center for young orthopedic surgeons. The interaction of the New York Central Railroad and support of a very influential and philanthropic Board of Managers helped promote the growth and development of this institution. In 1912, it relocated for the third time in its history to 321 East 42nd Street, just east of Second Avenue. That same year the HSS Alumni Association was founded as the Alumni Association of the R&C.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    About $109 million in 2005 dollars.

  2. 2.

    About $75 million in 2005 dollars.

  3. 3.

    About $26.5 million in 2005 dollars.

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Correspondence to David B. Levine MD.

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Levine, D.B. The Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled, Entering the Twentieth Century, ca. 1900 to 1912. HSS Jrnl 3, 2–12 (2007). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11420-006-9024-1

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Key words

  • Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled (R&C)
  • Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS)
  • Virgil P. Gibney
  • Royal Whitman
  • Harvard
  • Flexner
  • Hopkins
  • Rockefeller
  • Vanderbilt
  • New York Central Railroad
  • A. R. Shands
  • William Church Osborn