Forensic Toxicology

, Volume 33, Issue 2, pp 367–373 | Cite as

A new pyrazole-carboxamide type synthetic cannabinoid AB-CHFUPYCA [N-(1-amino-3-methyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl)-1-(cyclohexylmethyl)-3-(4-fluorophenyl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxamide] identified in illegal products

  • Nahoko Uchiyama
  • Kazuhiro Asakawa
  • Ruri Kikura-Hanajiri
  • Taizo Tsutsumi
  • Takashi Hakamatsuka
Original Article

Abstract

A new pyrazole-carboxamide type synthetic cannabinoid, AB-CHFUPYCA (1), was detected in illegal herbal products by our ongoing survey in Japan. The structure of 1 was identified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS), liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS), liquid chromatography–high-resolution-mass spectrometry (LC–HR-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses. Compound 1 showed a molecular weight of 400, and accurate mass measurement using LC–HR-MS revealed its molecular formula to be C22H29N4O2F. The MS and NMR spectrometric data revealed that the structure of 1 was N-(1-amino-3-methyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl)-1-(cyclohexylmethyl)-3-(4-fluorophenyl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxamide. Compound 1, which is a new type of synthetic cannabinoid, has a 3-(4-fluorophenyl)-1H-pyrazole group in place of a 1H-indazole group of AB-CHMINACA. To our knowledge, data on the chemistry and pharmacology of compound 1 have never been reported, and we therefore named compound 1 “AB-CHFUPYCA.”

Keywords

AB-CHFUPYCA [N-(1-amino-3-methyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl)-1-(cyclohexylmethyl)-3-(4-fluorophenyl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxamide] Pyrazole-carboxamide derivative Synthetic cannabinoid New psychoactive substance Illegal product Drug of abuse 

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Copyright information

© Japanese Association of Forensic Toxicology and Springer Japan 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nahoko Uchiyama
    • 1
  • Kazuhiro Asakawa
    • 2
  • Ruri Kikura-Hanajiri
    • 1
  • Taizo Tsutsumi
    • 2
  • Takashi Hakamatsuka
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Pharmacognosy, Phytochemistry and NarcoticsNational Institute of Health SciencesTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Tokushima Prefectural Public HealthPharmaceutical and Environmental Sciences CenterTokushimaJapan

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