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Forensic Toxicology

, Volume 33, Issue 2, pp 402–408 | Cite as

Diphenidine and its metabolites in blood and urine analyzed by MALDI-Q-TOF mass spectrometry

  • Kayoko Minakata
  • Itaru Yamagishi
  • Hideki Nozawa
  • Koutaro Hasegawa
  • Amin Wurita
  • Kunio Gonmori
  • Masako Suzuki
  • Kanako Watanabe
  • Osamu Suzuki
Letter to the Editor

Dear Editor

New psychoactive substances that are different from synthetic cannabinoids or cathinone derivatives have appeared very recently on illicit drug markets. In 2014, three reports were published on diphenidine distribution in Japan. The first study characterized diphenidine and 1-benzylpiperidine in a powdered product called “fragrance powder” [1], while the second determined diphenidine and 5-fluoro-AB-PINACA in a dubious herbal product [2]. The third study dealt with a fatal case in which a victim smoked a herbal product containing diphenidine together with a herbal product containing AB-CHMINACA and 5-fluoro-AMB [3]. The postmortem distributions of these substances determined by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS-MS) indicated that the main cause of death was diphenidine poisoning [3]. To date, the toxicity and metabolism of diphenidine have not been studied in any scientific context because it is a...

Keywords

Phenyl Ring Amitriptyline Piperidine Herbal Product Cathinone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Number 2560867) from the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports, and Culture of Japan.

Conflict of interest

There are no financial or other relations that could lead to a conflict interest.

Ethical approval

Informed consent was obtained from all individuals included in the study, who supplied about 1 ml each of whole blood for use as blank matrix.

References

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Copyright information

© Japanese Association of Forensic Toxicology and Springer Japan 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kayoko Minakata
    • 1
  • Itaru Yamagishi
    • 1
  • Hideki Nozawa
    • 1
  • Koutaro Hasegawa
    • 1
  • Amin Wurita
    • 1
  • Kunio Gonmori
    • 1
  • Masako Suzuki
    • 2
  • Kanako Watanabe
    • 1
  • Osamu Suzuki
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Legal MedicineHamamatsu University School of MedicineHamamatsuJapan
  2. 2.Research Equipment CenterHamamatsu University School of MedicineHamamatsuJapan

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