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Journal of Natural Medicines

, Volume 71, Issue 1, pp 315–320 | Cite as

Application of a quantitative 1H-NMR (1H-qNMR) method for the determination of geniposidic acid and acteoside in Plantaginis semen

  • Rie Tanaka
  • Risa Inagaki
  • Naoki Sugimoto
  • Hiroshi Akiyama
  • Akito Nagatsu
Note

Abstract

A quantitative 1H-NMR method (1H-qNMR) was developed to determine the concentration of acteoside and geniposidic acid in Plantaginis semen, which is an important crude drug for diuretic purposes. The purity of geniposidic acid and acteoside was determined by the ratio of the intensity of the H-3 signal at δ 7.51 ppm or the H-7″ signal at δ 7.58 ppm in methanol-d 4 to that of a hexamethyldisilane (HMD) signal at 0.04 ppm, respectively. The concentration of HMD was corrected with the International System of Units traceability using potassium hydrogen phthalate of certified reference material grade. The geniposidic acid content in two batches of Plantaginis semen as determined by 1H-qNMR was found to be 0.84 and 1.00 %, and the acteoside content was determined to be 0.80 and 0.93 %. We demonstrated that this method is useful for the quantitative analysis of geniposidic acid and acteoside in Plantainis semen.

Keywords

Geniposidic acid Acteoside 1H-qNMR Plantaginis semen Reagent purity 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank Dr. Y. Goda and Dr. N. Sugimoto of the National Institute of Health Sciences for their kind advice regarding the 1H-qNMR measurements. The authors are also grateful to Dr. S. Nishibe for helpful suggestions about the constituents of P. asiatica. This study was supported in part by a Health Labour Sciences Research Grant from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan.

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Pharmacognosy and Springer Japan 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Laboratory of Pharmacognosy, College of PharmacyKinjo Gakuin UniversityNagoyaJapan
  2. 2.National Institute of Health SciencesTokyoJapan

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