Journal of Natural Medicines

, Volume 60, Issue 3, pp 210–216 | Cite as

Immunomodulatory effect and quantitation of a cytotoxic glycosphingolipid from Murdannia loriformis

  • Weena Jiratchariyakul
  • Molvibha Vongsakul
  • Leena Sunthornsuk
  • Primchanien Moongkarndi
  • Ammararat Narintorn
  • Aimon Somanabandhu
  • Hikaru Okabe
  • August Wilhelm Frahm
Original Paper
  • 288 Downloads

Abstract

NMR signal reassignments for a cytotoxic glycosphingolipid compound, 2, β-O-D-glucopyranosyl-2-(2′-hydroxy-Z-6′-enecosamide)sphingosine, isolated from an ethanolic extract of the herb Murdannia loriformis, have been achieved by use of FAB-MS, and 1D and 2D 1H and 13C NMR. The amount of 2 in the herb juice was quantitatively determined by use of a validated HPLC method (RP-18, MeOH–H2O, UV detection at 210 nm). The immunomodulatory effect of the herb juice and of 2 was proved by means of in vitro cellular immunological assays. Compound 2 at a concentration of 13 nmol L−1 stimulated PBMC proliferation and increased the CD 3,4:CD 3,8 ratio in T lymphocytes.

Keywords

Murdannia loriformis Commelinaceae Cytotoxic glycosphingolipid β-O-D-glucopyranosyl-2-(2′-hydroxy-Z-6′-enecosamide)sphingosine Quantitative HPLC analysis Immunomodulator 

Notes

Acknowledgement

The authors thank the NRCT-JSPS, the Government Pharmaceutical Organization of Thailand and Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand, for financial support. Jiratchariyakul W is very grateful for the EU postdoctoral fellowship at the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Institute of Pharmacy, Freiburg University, Germany.

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Pharmacognosy and Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Weena Jiratchariyakul
    • 1
  • Molvibha Vongsakul
    • 2
  • Leena Sunthornsuk
    • 1
  • Primchanien Moongkarndi
    • 1
  • Ammararat Narintorn
    • 1
  • Aimon Somanabandhu
    • 1
  • Hikaru Okabe
    • 3
  • August Wilhelm Frahm
    • 4
  1. 1.Faculty of PharmacyMahidol UniversityBangkokThailand
  2. 2.Faculty of SciencesMahidol UniversityBangkokThailand
  3. 3.Laboratory of Pharmacognosy and Plant Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical SciencesFukuoka UniversityFukuokaJapan
  4. 4.Institute of Pharmaceutical ChemistryFreiburg UniversityFreiburgGermany

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