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Asian Journal of Criminology

, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp 1–23 | Cite as

Family Conferencing for Juvenile Offenders: A Singaporean Case Study in Restorative Justice

  • Wing-Cheong Chan
Article

Abstract

Restorative justice has been or is being adopted in many parts of the world, including countries in Asia. In the case of Singapore, restorative justice was adopted by the court system in 1997 as its guiding philosophy in its approach towards juvenile offenders. This article traces the adoption of restorative justice by the Juvenile Court in Singapore and the use of family conferencing in the light of the principles of restorative justice. It concludes by suggesting areas where the family conferencing system in Singapore can be improved, and possible lessons for other jurisdictions considering adopting family conferencing.

Keywords

Restorative justice Family conferencing Juvenile offender Singapore Asia 

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Legislation and Treaties

Singapore

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of LawNational University of SingaporeSingaporeSingapore

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