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Using Collaborative Documentation to Support Person-Centered Care in Substance Use Settings

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Abstract

The delivery of person-centered care (PCC) is critical to promoting service engagement among individuals who use substances. Collaborative documentation (CD) is an emerging person-centered practice used in community mental health, but has not been evaluated in substance use settings. This qualitative study conducted focus groups with substance use treatment providers (n=22) in an outpatient clinic to examine the impact of CD on PCC and clinical quality. Rapid qualitative analysis methods were used to identify key themes. Participants reported that using CD reduced documentation time and helped build trust and better understand their clients. Using CD presented unique challenges and opportunities when used with mandated populations or those with complex symptoms. The importance of honoring clients’ preference not to collaborate in care was a salient theme. Findings indicate that CD can promote PCC in substance use treatment. Targeted strategies to optimize CD for mandated and clinically complex populations are needed.

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Appendix

Appendix

Table 2

Table 2 Rapid Assessment Sheet

Table 3

Table 3 RITA Coding Template

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Matthews, E.B., Peral, M. Using Collaborative Documentation to Support Person-Centered Care in Substance Use Settings. J Behav Health Serv Res 51, 74–89 (2024). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11414-023-09866-z

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