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A Mixed-Method Investigation of Parent Perspectives on Early Childhood Behavioral Services in Primary Care

Abstract

Primary care is a key setting for the delivery of parent-focused behavioral interventions. Various methods of intervention show promising efficacy but fail to engage adequate parental participation. This study used a sequential-explanatory mixed-method design to understand factors underlying parents’ attitudes toward the content, sources, and delivery methods of behavioral guidance in primary care. Fifteen parents who previously participated in a larger survey study participated in interviews about their experiences and attitudes toward integrated primary care. Qualitative data were analyzed and sorted by quantitative data of interest to identify demographic, child, and parental factors that shape attitudes toward integrated care. Parents emphasized a need for tailored behavioral guidance, and multiple interconnected factors (e.g., trust of providers, perceived convenience of delivery modalities, stigma associated with behavioral health services) drove parents’ attitudes toward behavioral primary care. These attitudes varied based on socioeconomic status, child behavior symptoms, and reported use of corporal punishment.

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Correspondence to Andrew R. Riley PhD.

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This work was supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality [K12HS022981] and the Health Resources and Services Administration [D40HP26865]. The authors report no other competing interests.

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Riley, A.R., Walker, B.L., Ramanujam, K. et al. A Mixed-Method Investigation of Parent Perspectives on Early Childhood Behavioral Services in Primary Care. J Behav Health Serv Res 49, 134–148 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11414-021-09772-2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11414-021-09772-2