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Community Services for Mental Illnesses and Substance Use Disorders: the Moral Test of Our Time

  • Linda Rosenberg
Article

The moral test of government is how that government treats those who are in the dawn of life, the children; those who are in the twilight of life, the elderly; those who are in the shadows of life, the sick, the needy, and the handicapped.

—Hubert Humphrey

By almost any measure, we are failing people who need our help the most. Only four in ten people with serious mental illnesses receive behavioral health care, and only one in ten Americans with a substance use disorder receives treatment.1,2 The rest are served in homeless shelters, hospital emergency rooms, and jails and prisons, if they are served at all.

As several articles in this issue attest, significant barriers confront people of color and those with behavioral disorders in mental health treatment, in the emergency department, and in the juvenile justice system.35Numerous authors point to the importance of training staff for integrated care and the need to engage and retain individuals in treatment for mental illnesses and...

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Copyright information

© National Council for Behavioral Health 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Council for Behavioral HealthWashington, DCUSA

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