Quitting Mental Health Services among Racial and Ethnic Groups of Americans with Depression

  • Orion Mowbray
  • Rosalyn Denise Campbell
  • Irang Kim
  • Jessica A. Scott
Article

Abstract

Research on racial/ethnic differences in quitting mental health services has yet to examine the multiple forms of services offered and reasons why racial/ethnic groups quit. Data from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (CPES) examined whether race/ethnicity was related to quitting nine types of mental health services within a multivariate framework, and whether any racial/ethnic differences emerged among 16 assessed reasons for quitting mental health services (N = 437). Odds of quitting mental health services provided by social workers, non-medical health professionals, counselors, psychiatrists, and psychologists varied significantly by race/ethnicity. The most common reasons for quitting services included individuals wanting to handle the problem on their own, getting better, or not needing help anymore. The increased likelihood of quitting services represents an underexplored area for mental health service disparities and calls for improved efforts to retain racial and ethnic minorities in the mental health system.

Copyright information

© National Council for Behavioral Health 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Orion Mowbray
    • 1
  • Rosalyn Denise Campbell
    • 1
  • Irang Kim
    • 1
  • Jessica A. Scott
    • 1
  1. 1.Orion MowbrayUniversity of Georgia School of Social WorkAthensUSA

Personalised recommendations