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County Workforce, Reimbursement, and Organizational Factors Associated with Behavioral Health Capacity in Health Centers

  • Emily JonesEmail author
  • Leighton Ku
  • Shelagh Smith
  • Michael Lardiere
Article

Abstract

This study describes on-site behavioral health treatment capacity in health centers in 2007 and examines whether capacity was associated with health center characteristics, county-level behavioral health workforce, and same-day billing restrictions. Cross-sectional data from the 2007 Area Resource File and Uniform Data System were linked with data on Medicaid same-day billing restrictions. Mental health treatment capacity was common; almost four in five health centers provided on-site mental health services. Additional services such as crisis counseling (20 %), treatment from a psychiatrist (29 %), and substance abuse treatment were offered by fewer health centers (51 % provide on-site services and only 20 % employ substance abuse specialists). In multivariate analysis, larger health centers, health centers located in counties with a larger behavioral health workforce per capita, and those located in the West and Northeast were more likely to have behavioral health capacity. Same-day billing restrictions were associated with lower odds of substance use treatment capacity and providing 24 hr crisis counseling services.

Keywords

Health Center Behavioral Health Behavioral Health Service Behavioral Health Provider Crisis Counseling 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors are grateful to Alex Ross of the Health Resources and Services Administration for his comments on the manuscript draft. The views expressed in this publication are solely the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, or The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, nor does mention of the department or agency names imply endorsement by the US government.

Conflict of Interest

No authors have a conflict of interest to report, financial or otherwise.

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Copyright information

© National Council for Behavioral Health 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emily Jones
    • 1
    Email author
  • Leighton Ku
    • 2
  • Shelagh Smith
    • 3
  • Michael Lardiere
    • 4
  1. 1.Office of Economic Analysis, Evaluation, and Modeling in the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information TechnologyUnited States Department of Health and Human ServicesWashingtonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Health Policy, School of Public Health and Health ServicesGeorge Washington UniversityWashingtonUSA
  3. 3.Formerly of SAMHSA, Center for Mental Health Services, The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services AdministrationUnited States Department of Health and Human ServicesWashingtonUSA
  4. 4.Health Information Technology and Strategic Development, The National Council for Community Behavioral HealthcareWashingtonUSA

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