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Exploring the relationship between resistance and perspectival understanding in computer-mediated discussions

Abstract

This discourse analytic study explored the interconnection between resistance and perspectival understanding when students negotiated and constructed understandings in computer-mediated discussions in a graduate level course on the psychology of learning. Findings showed that resistance expressions often accompanied perspectival understanding as students elaborated on ideas from authors of course readings or peers. Furthermore, perspectival understanding was achieved both on the individual level and the group level as students showed resistance to the authors of course readings, their peers, and educational issues. These findings suggested that resistance played a role as a constructive discourse tool in a collaborative learning environment in which students made meaning of scholarly texts. This study is of importance in understanding the integral role of resistance in perspectival understanding in computer-mediated classroom discussions that has been rarely explored in empirical educational research.

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Notes

Contributions of the two authors to this article were equal. We rotate order of authorship in our writing.

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Correspondence to SoonAh Lee.

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Lee, S., Song, K. Exploring the relationship between resistance and perspectival understanding in computer-mediated discussions. Intern. J. Comput.-Support. Collab. Learn 11, 41–58 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11412-016-9228-4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11412-016-9228-4

Keywords

  • Resistance
  • Perspectival understanding
  • Computer-mediated discussion
  • Classroom discourse
  • Learning theory