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Self-monitoring of self-regulation during math homework behaviour using standardized diaries

Abstract

This study aims at enhancing math learning and general self-regulation by supporting daily self-regulated learning during math homework. The authors use standardized diaries as a self-monitoring tool to support self-regulatory behaviour. Following the theory of self-monitoring, frequent selfmonitoring of self-regulation will lead to an enhancement of self-regulated learning. Complete data stem from a sample of 195 8th grade students. 95 students from the experimental group answer questions in diaries for a period of 49 days and participate in the pre-post measurement whereas the control group only works on the pre- and posttests. The diary consists of questions regarding main components of self-regulation. The time-series analyses of the diary variables show a positive linear trend for self-regulation. The results of the analyses of variance for the pre-post experimental-control group comparison yielded time by group interactions for self-regulation and the math test.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    In the literature one is sometimes confronted with definitional problems of self-monitoring leading to possible confounding. The term self-monitoring is also used by Snyder (1974). He defines high self-monitoring people as particular sensitive to the ways they express and present themselves in social situations and skillfully adjust their performance in order to create or maintain appearances particular suited to their current situations. To be clear: we use the term self-monitoring in the sense of the definition of Webber et al. which was given above.

  2. 2.

    To avoid unnecessary lengthy wording we still use the term self-monitoring if the meaning is clear.

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Correspondence to Bernhard Schmitz.

Appendix: part of the diary

Appendix: part of the diary

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Schmitz, B., Perels, F. Self-monitoring of self-regulation during math homework behaviour using standardized diaries. Metacognition Learning 6, 255–273 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11409-011-9076-6

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Keywords

  • Self-monitoring
  • Self-regulation
  • Diaries
  • Time-series
  • Homework
  • Math