International Journal of Hindu Studies

, Volume 12, Issue 2, pp 103–151 | Cite as

The Design Argument in Classical Hindu Thought

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© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Trinity UniversitySan AntonioUSA

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