Journal of Soils and Sediments

, Volume 18, Issue 4, pp 1265–1278 | Cite as

Comparison of hydrophobic and amphiphilic fractions of dissolved organic matter from a water reservoir by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

  • Guixue Song
  • Rajaa Mesfioui
  • Aaron Dotson
  • Paul Westerhoff
  • Patrick Hatcher
Natural Organic Matter: Chemistry, Function and Fate in the Environment

Abstract

Purpose

Dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition is influenced by and modulates biogeochemical processes, yet DOM characterization techniques are challenged by its heterogeneous properties and structures. In this paper, ultrahigh electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ESI-FTICR) mass spectrometry is used to characterize previously isolated and well-characterized four DOM fractions from a water reservoir in the southwestern part of the USA.

Materials and methods

About 50–60 L water samples were collected from Lake Pleasant (a water reservoir of Colorado River) and isolated and fractionated using a sequential isolation and fractionation procedure. DOM was firstly fractionated to the colloids and soluble permeate, then hydrophobic acids (HPO-A) and neutrals (HPO-N) plus amphiphilic acids (AMP-A) and neutrals (AMP-N) were fractionated using the resin-in-tandem procedure. Approximately 0.7 mg sample was dissolved in 250 μL methanol/water mixture (1:1, v/v) and diluted twice with 0.1 % (by volume) NH4OH (in 1:1 methanol/water, v/v) and measured by ESI-FTICR in negative ion mode.

Results and discussion

In the m/z range of <700, among the sum of 4107 peaks, HPO-N contained the most assigned 1763 molecules and HPO-A, AMP-N, and AMP-A contained 971, 990, and 293, respectively. Acid fractions were relatively more oxygenated than the corresponding neutrals. Except for the major assigned CHO molecules, a high portion of heteroatom-containing molecules were assigned in the neutral fractions. Van Krevelen and Venn diagrams analyses showed significant molecular differentiation among the fractions. Among the assigned formulas, the Venn diagram indicated only a small portion (<4 %) of distinct formulas overlapped. S-containing molecules were efficiently ionized and identified in the neutrals. Some of the S1-containing compounds with high signal magnitudes are tentatively assigned to alkylbenzene sulfonates and their biodegradation and biotransformation derivatives indicating anthropogenic input on site.

Conclusions

By using the XAD resin-in-tandem approach and FTICR-MS, numbers of DOM molecules in fractions were distinctly separated, accordingly the complexity of DOM was reduced. Furthermore, to a great extent, the compositions and structures of each fraction in the molecular level are remarkably different as evidenced by only small portion of molecules overlapping.

Keywords

Amphiphilic DOM ESI FTICR-MS Hydrophobic 

Notes

Acknowledgment

This material was based on work supported by the National Science Foundation under grant number BCS-1026865, Central Arizona- Phoenix Long-Term Ecological Research (CAP LTER).

Supplementary material

11368_2016_1582_MOESM1_ESM.docx (22 kb)
ESM 1 (DOCX 22 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Pony Testing International Group Co., LtdBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.School of Sustainable Engineering and The Built EnvironmentArizona State UniversityTempeUSA
  3. 3.Department of Chemistry and BiochemistryOld Dominion UniversityNorfolkUSA
  4. 4.Engineering DepartmentUniversity of Alaska AnchorageAnchorageUSA

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