Journal of Chinese Political Science

, Volume 18, Issue 4, pp 355–374 | Cite as

Bringing a Network Perspective to Chinese Internet Studies: An Exploratory Analysis

Research Article

Abstract

This paper adopts a network perspective to explore the ways digitally-mediated relationships prompt social and/or political participation in China. In the “chicken game scenario”, my analysis suggests that collective actions are facilitated by both weak and strong ties, which generate a fairly unified collective identity that is conductive to high-risk mobilization. In the “public crisis scenario”, it is generally weak ties that facilitate relatively lower-risk mobilization. In the “compromise scenario”, if collective actions do occur, they are generally low-risk and non-political. This appears to be largely due to the dominance of weak ties in the compromise scenario. The “banal scenario” is a black box that has yet to be sufficiently investigated in the future.

Keywords

Chinese Internet Studies Digitally-Mediated Relationships Weak Ties Strong Ties Political Participation 

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Copyright information

© Journal of Chinese Political Science/Association of Chinese Political Studies 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of GovernmentUniversity College CorkCorkIreland

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