Micro-morphological response of some native dicotyledonous species to particulate pollutants emitted from stone crushing activities

Abstract

Stone crushing processes release particulates and associated noxious substances in our surroundings that are continuously destructing environmental conditions and ecosystem health. Morpho-anatomical changes in some medicinally important native species (Aerva javanica, Calotropis procera, Digera muricata, Euphorbia prostrata, Euploca strigosa, and Peganum harmala) exposed to heavy dust pollution were evaluated. These species selected on the basis of their ubiquitous distribution in the area. Two sites were selected in the Kirana Hills, Sargodha, one near stone crushers within 500-m radius (polluted) and the other 4 km away from the crushers (control) varying significantly in amount of dust particles received. A decrease in plant height of all species from dust-polluted sites was observed. Reduction in height was more prominent in species like C. procera and D. muricata. Stem sclerification increased in C. procera and E. prostrata from the polluted site that is an indication of better tolerance to dust pollution. C. procera showed increased stem and leaf epidermis, stem sclerenchyma, and stem vascular bundles, which can increase resistance to dust pollution. E. strigosa was the most sensitive species in which all morpho-anatomical factors decreased. Survival of plant species depended on specific structural modifications in dermal, mechanical, parenchymatous, and vascular tissue. Overall, dust pollution severely affected plant morphological and micro-morphological traits, but the response of selected species to dust pollution was variable. It is concluded that stem and leaf anatomical traits like size of dermal and storage tissue thickness and stomatal density are good indicators for biomonitoring of dust pollution.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Fig. 1
Fig. 2
Fig. 3
Fig. 4
Fig. 5

Data availability

The herbarium samples used for identification of plant species deposited to the Herbarium Collection of the Department of Botany, University of Agriculture Faisalabad.

References

  1. Ade-Ademilua OE, Obalola DA (2008) The effect of cement dust pollution on Celosia argentea (Lagos spinach) plant. J Environ Sci Technol 1:47–55

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  2. Ahmad KS, Hameed M, Deng J, Ashraf M, Hamid A, Ahmad F, Fatima S, Akhtar N (2016) Ecotypic adaptations in Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon) for altitudinal stress tolerance. Biologia 71:885–895

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  3. Aminiyan MM, Baalousha M, Mousavi R, Aminiyan FM, Hosseini H, Heydariyan A (2018) The ecological risk, source identification, and pollution assessment of heavy metals in road dust: a case study in Rafsanjan, SE Iran. Environ Sci Pollut Res 25:13382–13395

    Article  Google Scholar 

  4. Beckett KP, Freer-Smith PH, Taylor G (2000) Particulate pollution capture by urban trees effect of species and wind speed. Glob Chang Biol 6:995–1003

    Article  Google Scholar 

  5. Braun M, Margitai Z, Tóth A, Leermakers M (2007) Environmental monitoring using linden tree leaves as natural traps of atmospheric deposition: a pilot study in Transilvania, Romania. Acta Geograph Debrecina Landsc Environ 1(1):24–35

    Google Scholar 

  6. Chaturvedi RK, Prasad S, Rana S, Obaidullah SM, Pandey V, Singh H (2013) Effect of dust load on the leaf attributes of the tree species growing along the roadside. Environ Monit Assess 185:383–391

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  7. Chaudhary IJ, Rathore D (2019) Dust pollution: its removal and effect on foliage physiology of urban trees. Sustain Cities Soc 51:101696

    Article  Google Scholar 

  8. Dubey B, Pal AK, Singh G (2018) Airborne particulate matter: source scenario and their impact on human health and environment. In Climate Change and Environmental Concerns: Breakthroughs in Research and Practice, IGI Global, pp:447–468

  9. El-Sherbeny GAA, Najm AA (2016) Physiological and anatomical behaviour of Cynanchum acutum in response to cement dust pollution. J Environ Sci Technol 9:345–353

    Article  Google Scholar 

  10. Frosi G, Oliveira MT, Almeida-Cortez J, Santos MG (2013) Ecophysiological performance of C. procera: an exotic and evergreen species in Caatinga, Brazilian semi-arid. Acta Physiol Plant 35:335–344

    Google Scholar 

  11. Iqbal M, Iftikhar M, Ahmad MSA, Hameed M, Noreen A, Ikram M, Muneeb A, Ahmad I (2016) Vegetation dynamics of anthropogenically disturbed ecosystem in hilly areas around Sargodha, Pakistan. Int J Agric Biol 18:830–836

    Article  Google Scholar 

  12. Inuwa Y, Mohammed MI (2018) Pollution indices and transfer factors of metals in selected medicinal herbs from Kano Metropolis. Discovery Sci 14:100–108

    Google Scholar 

  13. Jiménez MD, De Torre R, Mola I, Casado MA, Balaguer L (2018) Local plant responses to global problems: Dactylis glomerata responses to different traffic pollutants on roadsides. J Environ Manag 212:440–449

    Article  Google Scholar 

  14. Joshi PC, Swami A (2009) Air pollution induced changes in the photosynthetic pigments of selected plant species. J Environ Biol 30:295–298

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  15. Kapoor CS (2014) Ficus benghalensis L. tree as an efficient option for controlling air pollution. Res Health Nutr 2:1–11

    Google Scholar 

  16. Khan I, Zhong N, Luo Q, Ai J, Yao L, Luo P (2020) Mineral composition and origin of organic matter input in Neoproterozoic–Lower Cambrian organic-rich shales of Salt Range Formation, upper Indus Basin, Pakistan. Int J Coal Geol 217:103319

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  17. Leghari SK, Zaid MA, Sarangzai AM, Faheem M (2013) Effect of road side dust pollution on growth and total chlorophyll contents in Vitis vinifera L.(grape). Afr J Biotechnol 13:1237–1242

    Google Scholar 

  18. Li SY, Man D, Li GD (2018) Ecological study of deterioration performance for concrete in saline soil environment. Ekoloji 27:659–666

    Google Scholar 

  19. Liu L, Guan D, Peart MR, Wang G, Zhang H, Li Z (2013) The dust retention capacities of urban vegetation—a case study of Guangzhou, South China. Environ Sci Pollut Res 20:6601–6610

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  20. Mehraj SS, Bhat GA (2014) Cement factories, air pollution and consequences. Jammu and Kashmir, India. Department of Environmental Science & Centre of Research for Development, University of Kashmir, Jammu and Kashmir, pp.30-36

  21. Mickky BM, Abbas MA, El-Shhaby OA (2018) Alterations in photosynthetic capacity and morpho-histological features of leaf in alfalfa plants subjected to water deficit-stress in different soil types. Indian J Plant Physiol 23:426–443

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  22. Naidoo G, Chirkoot D (2004) The effects of coal dust on photosynthetic performance of the mangrove, Avicennia marina in Richards Bay, South Africa. Environ Pollut 127:359–366

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  23. Pal A, Kulshreshtha K, Ahmad KJ, Behl HM (2002) Do leaf surface characters play a role in plant resistance to auto exhaust pollution. Flora 197:47–55

    Article  Google Scholar 

  24. Paull NJ, Krix D, Irga PJ, Torpy FR (2020) Airborne particulate matter accumulation on common green wall plants. Int J Phytoremed 22:594–606

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  25. Rahman MM, Rahman MA, Miah MG, Saha SR, Karim MA, Mostofa MG (2017) Mechanistic insight into salt tolerance of Acacia auriculiformis: the importance of ion selectivity, osmoprotection, tissue tolerance, and Na+ exclusion. Front Plant Sci 8:155

    Google Scholar 

  26. Rai A, Kulshreshtha K, Strivastava PK, Mohanty CS (2010) Leaf surface structure alterations due to particulate pollution in some common plants. Environmentalist 30:18–23

    Article  Google Scholar 

  27. Rai PK, Panda LLS (2015) Roadside plants as bio indicators of air pollution in an industrial region, Rourkela, India. Int J Adv Res Technol 4:14–36

    Google Scholar 

  28. Rivas R, Frosi G, Ramos DG, Pereira S, Benko-Iseppon AM, Santos MG (2017) Photosynthetic limitation and mechanisms of photoprotection under drought and recovery of C. procera, an evergreen C3 from arid regions. Plant Physiol Biochem 118:589–599

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  29. Ruzin, 1999

  30. Shah K, Ul Amin N, Ahmad I, Ara G (2018) Impact assessment of leaf pigments in selected landscape plants exposed to roadside dust. Environ Sci Pollut Res 25:23055–23073

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  31. Shah K, Ul Amin N, Ahmad I, Ara G Ur Rahman M, Zuo X, Xing L, Ren X (2019a) Cement dust induce stress and attenuates photosynthesis in Arachis hypogaea. Environ Sci Pollut Res 26:19490–19501

  32. Shah K, Ul Amin N, Ahmad I, Ara G, Ren X, Xing L (2019b) Effects of chronic dust load on leaf pigments of the landscape plant Murraya paniculata. Gesunde Pflanzen 71:249–258

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  33. Simon E, Baranyai E, Braun M, Cserháti C, Fábián I, Tóthmérész B (2014) Elemental concentrations in deposited dust on leaves along an urbanization gradient. Sci Total Environ 490:514–520

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  34. Singh H, Sharma R, Sinha S, Kumar M, Kumar P, Verma A, Sharma SK (2017) Physiological functioning of Lagerstroemia speciosa L. under heavy roadside traffic: an approach to screen potential species for abatement of urban air pollution. Biotech 7:61

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  35. Thambavani SD, Prathipa V (2012) Biomonitoring of air pollution around urban and industrial sites. J Res Biol 1:7–14

    Google Scholar 

  36. Tiwari P, Pandey S (2017) Impact of cement dust pollution on leaf anatomical features of Lantana camara and Calotropis procera. Curr Sci Int 6:34–40

    Google Scholar 

  37. Wang HX, Shi H, Li YY (2010) Relationships between leaf surface characteristics and dust capturing capability of urban greening plant species. Chinese J. Appl Ecol 21:3077–3082

  38. Wuytack T, Samson R, Wuyts K, Adriaenssens S, Kardel F, Verheyen K (2013) Do leaf characteristics of white willow (Salix alba L.), Northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) respond differently to ambient air pollution and other environmental stressors? Water Air Soil Pollut 224:1–14

    Google Scholar 

  39. Wuytack T, Wuyts K, Van Dongen S, Baeten L, Kardel F, Verheyen K, Samson R (2011) The effect of air pollution and other environmental stressors on leaf fluctuating asymmetry and specific leaf area of Salix alba L. Environ Pollut 159:2405–2411

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

Download references

Acknowledgments

This manuscript is a part of M.Phil. research of Miss Libaba Shamsi submitted to Department of Botany, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad.

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Contributions

Iftikhar Ahmad, Mansoor Hameed, and Farooq Ahmad supervised the research work of Lubaba Shamsi. Sana Fatima, Anum Javaid, and Muhammad Asim Sultan helped in data collection and manuscript preparation. Muhammad Sajid Aqeel Ahmad analyzed the data statistically and performed the multivariate analysis. Muhammad Ashraf proofread the manuscript for language editing.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Mansoor Hameed.

Ethics declarations

Ethical approval

The manuscript submitted solely to Environmental Science and Pollution Research and no part published or submitted elsewhere. All ethical guidelines set by parent institution(s) were observed during sampling and analysis.

Consent to participate and publish

All authors equally participated in execution of experiment and unanimously agreed to publish in Environmental Science and Pollution Research.

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Additional information

Publisher’s note

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Responsible Editor: Gangrong Shi

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Ahmad, I., Shamsi, L., Hameed, M. et al. Micro-morphological response of some native dicotyledonous species to particulate pollutants emitted from stone crushing activities. Environ Sci Pollut Res (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-021-12463-2

Download citation

Keywords

  • Dust pollution
  • Leaf thickness
  • Metaxylem
  • Micro-morphology
  • Plant height
  • Sclerification