A new carbon emission reduction mechanism: Carbon Generalized System of Preferences (CGSP)

Abstract

Countries throughout the whole world, including China, are working together to curb the greenhouse effect, but the effects seem very limited in spite of the fact that various low-carbon development strategies have been adopted, particularly in industrial enterprises. Therefore, carbon emissions caused by the public should be taken seriously, and the public should be encouraged to engage in behavior that limits carbon emissions. Therefore, this article introduces a new incentive mechanism called the Carbon Generalized System of Preferences (CGSP), which was first introduced in Guangdong Province, China. It is believed that this new mechanism matches the role of leadership in Guangdong in the urbanization and economic development of China by addressing the small sources of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and by issuing carbon coins. Compared with Chinese Certified Emission Reduction (CCER), the development scope, management level, and novel criteria of CGSP are very different but relatively easy for the public to accept. The CGSP shows that the network platform, reduced carbon emissions, and urban pilots are all compatible with the goals of the nation and city, and they promote the CGSP in different ways. Because of its consistency with ecological civilization in China, the prospect of the CGSP is bright; however, there are some challenges, such as policy and economic factors, combined with pollution control.

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Data availability

All data generated or analyzed during this study are included in this published article.

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Acknowledgments

The authors also gratefully acknowledge the help from Bureau of Ecology and Environment of Zhongshan, Development and Reform Bureau of Zhongshan.

Funding

This work was supported by the Zhongshan Science and Technology Project (2019B2015).

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Authors

Contributions

Yinghua XIAO analyzed and interpreted the data and condition of CGSP, was a major contributor in writing the manuscript; Yuping JIANG review the content of the article; Min DU performed the policy analysis; Shaojuan GAN, Zhaoteng TAN, Xiaoxin TAN, Miao ZHANG, and Xibing WU separately carried out the part of the research for ecological civilization, collaborative control, prospect, preliminary situation, and PHCER. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Yu-Ping Jiang.

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Xiao, YH., Jiang, YP., Du, M. et al. A new carbon emission reduction mechanism: Carbon Generalized System of Preferences (CGSP). Environ Sci Pollut Res (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-020-11670-7

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Keyword

  • Climate change
  • Carbon Generalized System of Preferences
  • Public
  • Development