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Does waste energy usage mitigate the CO2 emissions? A time-frequency domain analysis

Abstract

There exist many seminal studies in the literature searching the influences of total renewable usage (or usage of its some components) on CO2 emissions. However, to the best of our knowledge, there does not exist a research work in the literature considering the co-movements between waste energy consumption and CO2 emissions. This paper aims at observing the possible negative or positive impacts of waste energy consumption on environmental quality (in terms of CO2) by monitoring the whole sample period and all subsample periods in the USA for the monthly period 1980:1–2018:12. This paper searches also the positive or negative lead-lag relations between waste and CO2 emissions, if exist, by considering high frequency (1–3-year cycle) and low frequency (3–8-year cycle) of the same sample period and subsample periods. The findings obtained by this research in general might underline (a) the outcome indicating that waste energy usage has been effective in diminishing the carbon emissions after the second half of the 2010s in the USA and (b) the energy policy act(s) in the USA implemented which eventually resulted in lower CO2 emissions in the USA especially after the second half of the 2000s. The paper suggests as well some policy proposals which might result in positive contribution of waste energy on environmental quality.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    Waste energy is not included in total renewable energy consumption.

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Appendix

Appendix

Table 4 The works investigating total waste and/or its components in different fields

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Bilgili, F., Kuşkaya, S., Ünlü, F. et al. Does waste energy usage mitigate the CO2 emissions? A time-frequency domain analysis. Environ Sci Pollut Res 27, 5056–5073 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-019-07253-w

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Keywords

  • Waste energy
  • CO2 emissions
  • The USA
  • Wavelet coherency
  • Partial wavelet coherency
  • Energy policy