Advertisement

Environmental Science and Pollution Research

, Volume 24, Issue 30, pp 23528–23537 | Cite as

Enhanced adsorption of hexavalent chromium by a biochar derived from ramie biomass (Boehmeria nivea (L.) Gaud.) modified with β-cyclodextrin/poly(L-glutamic acid)

  • Luhua Jiang
  • Shaobo Liu
  • Yunguo Liu
  • Guangming Zeng
  • Yiming Guo
  • Yicheng Yin
  • Xiaoxi Cai
  • Lu Zhou
  • Xiaofei Tan
  • Xixian Huang
Research Article

Abstract

This paper explored biochar modification to enhance biochar’s ability to adsorb hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution. The ramie stem biomass was pyrolyzed and then treated by β-cyclodextrin/poly(L-glutamic acid) which contained plentiful functional groups. The pristine and modified biochar were characterized by FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, specific surface area, and zeta potential measurement. Results indicated that the β-cyclodextrin/poly(L-glutamic acid) was successfully bound to the biochar surface. Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the kinetics, isotherm, thermodynamics, and adsorption/desorption of Cr(VI). Adsorption capacities of CGA-biochar were significantly higher than that of the untreated biochar, and its maximum adsorption capacity could reach up to 197.21 mg/g at pH 2.0. Results also illustrated that sorption performance depended on initial solution pH; in addition, acidic condition was beneficial to the Cr(VI) uptake. Furthermore, the Cr(VI) uptake was significantly affected by the ion strength and cation species. This study demonstrated that CGA-biochar could be a potential adsorbent for Cr(VI) pollution control.

Keywords

Ramie biomass Biochar Adsorption Hexavalent chromium β-Cyclodextrin Poly(L-glutamic acid) 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51521006 and 51609268), the Hunan Provincial Innovation Foundation for Postgraduate (Grant No. CX2016B135), and the Key Project of Technological Innovation in the Field of Social Development of Hunan Province, China (Grant Nos. 2016SK2010 and 2016SK2001).

Supplementary material

11356_2017_9833_MOESM1_ESM.docx (335 kb)
ESM 1 (DOCX 335 kb)

References

  1. Angelini LG, Tavarini S (2013) Ramie [Boehmeria Nivea (L.) gaud.] as a potential new fibre crop for the Mediterranean region: growth, crop yield and fibre quality in a long-term field experiment in Central Italy. Ind Crop Prod 51:138–144CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Azarudeen RS, Subha R, Jeyakumar D, Burkanudeen AR (2013) Batch separation studies for the removal of heavy metal ions using a chelating terpolymer: synthesis, characterization and isotherm models. Sep Purif Technol 116:366–377CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Badruddoza AZM, Tay ASH, Tan PY et al (2011) Carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin conjugated magnetic nanoparticles as nano-adsorbents for removal of copper ions: synthesis and adsorption studies. J Hazard Mater 185:1177–1186CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Badruddoza AZM, Shawon ZBZ, Tay WJD et al (2013) Fe3O4/cyclodextrin polymer nanocomposites for selective heavy metals removal from industrial wastewater. Carbohydr Polym 91:322–332CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Bayramoğlu G, Arıca MY (2005) Ethylenediamine grafted poly (glycidylmethacrylate-co-methylmethacrylate) adsorbent for removal of chromate anions. Sep Purif Technol 45:192–199CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Beesley L, Moreno-Jiménez E, Gomez-Eyles JL et al (2011) A review of biochars’ potential role in the remediation, revegetation and restoration of contaminated soils. Environ Pollut 159:3269–3282CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Betts AR, Ning C, Hamilton JG, Derek P (2013) Rates and mechanisms of Zn2+ adsorption on a meat and bonemeal biochar. Environ Sci Technol 47:14350–14357CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Bhattacharyya D, Hestekin JA, Brushaber P et al (1998) Novel poly-glutamic acid functionalized microfiltration membranes for sorption of heavy metals at high capacity. J Membr Sci 141:121–135CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Chen Z, Xiao X, Chen B, Zhu L (2014) Quantification of chemical states, dissociation constants and contents of oxygen-containing groups on the surface of biochars produced at different temperatures. Environ Sci Technol 49:309–317CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Crini G, Peindy HN, Gimbert F, Robert C (2007) Removal of CI basic green 4 (malachite green) from aqueous solutions by adsorption using cyclodextrin-based adsorbent: kinetic and equilibrium studies. Sep Purif Technol 53:97–110CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Devi P, Saroha AK (2014) Synthesis of the magnetic biochar composites for use as an adsorbent for the removal of pentachlorophenol from the effluent. Bioresour Technol 169:525–531CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Du F, Meng H, Xu K et al (2014) CPT loaded nanoparticles based on beta-cyclodextrin-grafted poly (ethylene glycol)/poly (L-glutamic acid) diblock copolymer and their inclusion complexes with CPT. Colloids Surf B Biointerfaces 113:230–236CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Fu R, Zhang X, Xu Z, et al (2017) Fast and highly efficient removal of chromium (VI) using humus-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron: influencing factors, kinetics and mechanism. Sep Purif Technol 174:362–371Google Scholar
  14. Gan C, Liu Y, Tan X et al (2015) Effect of porous zinc–biochar nanocomposites on Cr (VI) adsorption from aqueous solution. RSC Adv 5:35107–35115CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Ghadim EE, Manouchehri F, Soleimani G et al (2013) Adsorption properties of tetracycline onto graphene oxide: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies. PLoS One 8:e79254CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Hu X, Liu Y, Zeng G et al (2014) Effects of background electrolytes and ionic strength on enrichment of Cd (II) ions with magnetic graphene oxide–supported sulfanilic acid. J Colloid Interface Sci 435:138–144CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Huang DL, Zeng GM, Feng CL et al (2008) Degradation of lead-contaminated lignocellulosic waste by Phanerochaete chrysosporium and the reduction of lead toxicity. Environ Sci Technol 42:4946–4951CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Huang X, Liu Y, Liu S et al (2016) Effective removal of Cr (VI) using β-cyclodextrin–chitosan modified biochars with adsorption/reduction bifuctional roles. RSC Adv 6:94–104CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Inbaraj BS, Wang JS, Lu JF et al (2009) Adsorption of toxic mercury (II) by an extracellular biopolymer poly (γ-glutamic acid). Bioresour Technol 100:200–207CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Inyang M, Gao B, Pullammanappallil P et al (2010) Biochar from anaerobically digested sugarcane bagasse. Bioresour Technol 101:8868–8872CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Jiang L, Liu Y, Zeng G et al (2016) Removal of 17β-estradiol by few-layered graphene oxide nanosheets from aqueous solutions: external influence and adsorption mechanism. Chem Eng J 284:93–102CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Jiang L, Liu Y, Liu S et al (2017a) Fabrication of β-cyclodextrin/poly(L-glutamic acid) supported magnetic graphene oxide and its adsorption behavior for 17β-estradiol. Chem Eng J 308:597–605CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Jiang L, Liu Y, Liu S et al (2017b) Adsorption of estrogen contaminants by graphene nanomaterials under natural organic matter preloading: comparison to carbon nanotube, biochar, and activated carbon. Environ Sci Technol 51:6352–6359CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Kennedy AR, Kirkhouse JBA, Mccarney KM et al (2004) Supramolecular motifs in s-block metal-bound sulfonated monoazo dyes, part 1: structural class controlled by cation type and modulated by sulfonate aryl ring position. Chemistry (Easton) 10:4606–4615Google Scholar
  25. Li M, Liu Y, Liu S et al (2017a) Cu(II)-influenced adsorption of ciprofloxacin from aqueous solutions by magnetic graphene oxide/nitrilotriacetic acid nanocomposite: competition and enhancement mechanisms. Chem Eng J 319:219–228CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Li M, Liu Y, Zeng G et al (2017b) Tetracycline absorbed onto nitrilotriacetic acid-functionalized magnetic graphene oxide: influencing factors and uptake mechanism. J Colloid Interface Sci 485:269–279CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Liu S, Tan X, Liu Y et al (2016) Production of biochars from Ca impregnated ramie biomass (Boehmeria nivea (L.) Gaud.) and their phosphate removal potential. RSC Adv 6:5871–5880CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Ma Y, Liu W-J, Zhang N et al (2014) Polyethylenimine modified biochar adsorbent for hexavalent chromium removal from the aqueous solution. Bioresour Technol 169:403–408CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Melancon MP, Lu W, Huang Q et al (2010) Targeted imaging of tumor-associated M2 macrophages using a macromolecular contrast agent PG-Gd-NIR813. Biomaterials 31:6567–6573CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Mohan D, Sarswat A, Ok YS, Pittman CU (2014) Organic and inorganic contaminants removal from water with biochar, a renewable, low cost and sustainable adsorbent—a critical review. Bioresour Technol 160:191–202CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Qian L, Chen B (2014) Interactions of aluminum with biochars and oxidized biochars: implications for the biochar aging process. J Agric Food Chem 62:373–380CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Qu Y, Zhang X, Xu J et al (2014) Removal of hexavalent chromium from wastewater using magnetotactic bacteria. Sep Purif Technol 136:10–17CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Schierz A, Zänker H (2009) Aqueous suspensions of carbon nanotubes: surface oxidation, colloidal stability and uranium sorption. Environ Pollut 157:1088–1094CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Suguihiro TM, de Oliveira PR, Mangrich AS et al (2013) An electroanalytical approach for evaluation of biochar adsorption characteristics and its application for lead and cadmium determination. Bioresour Technol 143C:40–45CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Tan X, Liu Y, Gu Y et al (2015a) Immobilization of Cd (II) in acid soil amended with different biochars with a long term of incubation. Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 22:12597CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Tan X, Liu Y, Zeng G et al (2015b) Application of biochar for the removal of pollutants from aqueous solutions. Chemosphere 125:70–85CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Tan X, Liu S, Liu Y et al (2016) One-pot synthesis of carbon supported calcined-Mg/Al layered double hydroxides for antibiotic removal by slow pyrolysis of biomass waste. Sci Rep 6:39691CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Tang L, Zeng GM, Shen GL et al (2008) Rapid detection of Picloram in agricultural field samples using a disposable immunomembrane-based electrochemical sensor. Environ Sci Technol 42:1207–1212CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Trazzi PA, Leahy JJ, Hayes MHB, Kwapinski W (2016) Adsorption and desorption of phosphate on biochars. J Environ Chem Eng 4:37–46CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Wang J, Chen C (2014) Chitosan-based biosorbents: modification and application for biosorption of heavy metals and radionuclides. Bioresour Technol 160:129–141CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Wei S, Li D, Huang Z et al (2013) High-capacity adsorption of Cr (VI) from aqueous solution using a hierarchical porous carbon obtained from pig bone. Bioresour Technol 134:407–411CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Yakout SM (2015) Monitoring the changes of chemical properties of rice straw-derived biochars modified by different oxidizing agents and their adsorptive performance for organics. Bioremediat J 19:171–182CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Yan S, Wang T, Feng L et al (2014a) Injectable in situ self-cross-linking hydrogels based on poly (l-glutamic acid) and alginate for cartilage tissue engineering. Biomacromolecules 15:4495–4508CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Yan S, Zhang X, Sun Y et al (2014b) In situ preparation of magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles inside nanoporous poly(L-glutamic acid)/chitosan microcapsules for drug delivery. Colloids Surf B Biointerfaces 113:302–311CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Zhang Y, Chen Y, Westerhoff P, Crittenden J (2009) Impact of natural organic matter and divalent cations on the stability of aqueous nanoparticles. Water Res 43:4249–4257CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Zhang M, Gao B, Yao Y et al (2012) Synthesis, characterization, and environmental implications of graphene-coated biochar. Sci Total Environ 435:567–572CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Zhou Y, Gao B, Zimmerman AR et al (2013) Sorption of heavy metals on chitosan-modified biochars and its biological effects. Chem Eng J 231:512–518CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luhua Jiang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shaobo Liu
    • 3
  • Yunguo Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Guangming Zeng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yiming Guo
    • 4
  • Yicheng Yin
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiaoxi Cai
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lu Zhou
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiaofei Tan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xixian Huang
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.College of Environmental Science and EngineeringHunan UniversityChangshaPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of EducationChangshaPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.School of Metallurgy and EnvironmentCentral South UniversityChangshaPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.School of Economics and ManagementShanghai Maritime UniversityShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China

Personalised recommendations