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Environmental Science and Pollution Research

, Volume 24, Issue 15, pp 13775–13781 | Cite as

Phytotoxicity of CeO2 nanoparticles on radish plant (Raphanus sativus)

  • Xin Gui
  • Mengmeng Rui
  • Youhong Song
  • Yuhui Ma
  • Yukui RuiEmail author
  • Peng Zhang
  • Xiao He
  • Yuanyuan Li
  • Zhiyong Zhang
  • Liming Liu
Research Article

Abstract

Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) have been considered as one type of emerging contaminants that pose great potential risks to the environment and human health. The effect of CeO2 NPs on plant-edible parts and health evaluation remains is necessary and urgently to be developed. In this study, we cultivated radish in Sigma CeO2 NP (<25 nm)-amended soils across a series of concentration treatments, i.e., 0 mg/kg as the control and 10, 50, and 100 mg/kg CeO2 NPs. The results showed that CeO2 NPs accelerated the fresh biomass accumulation of radish plant; especially in the treatment of 50 mg/kg CeO2 NPs, root expansion was increased by 2.2 times as much as the control. In addition, the relative chlorophyll content enhanced by 12.5, 12.9, and 12.2% was compared to control on 40 cultivation days. CeO2 NPs were mainly absorbed by the root and improved the activity of antioxidant enzyme system to scavenge the damage of free radicals in radish root and leaf. In addition, this study also indicated that the nanoparticles might enter the food chain through the soil into the edible part of the plant, which will be a potential threat to human health.

Keywords

CeO2 Nanoparticles Radish Soil 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The project was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (no. 41371471) and NSFC-Guangdong Joint Fund (U1401234). The authors gratefully acknowledge the technical assistance with ICP-MS provided by the Key Laboratory for Biological Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety of Chinese Academy of Sciences.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xin Gui
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mengmeng Rui
    • 1
    • 3
  • Youhong Song
    • 4
  • Yuhui Ma
  • Yukui Rui
    • 1
    Email author
  • Peng Zhang
    • 5
  • Xiao He
    • 5
  • Yuanyuan Li
    • 5
  • Zhiyong Zhang
    • 5
  • Liming Liu
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Resources and Environmental SciencesChina Agricultural UniversityBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.College of ForestryHenan Agricultural UniversityZhengzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.College of AgricultureGuangxi UniversityNanningPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.School of AgronomyAnhui Agricultural UniversityHefeiPeople’s Republic of China
  5. 5.Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical TechniquesInstitute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingPeople’s Republic of China

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