Mercury, lead, and cadmium in tissues of the Caspian Pond Turtle (Mauremys caspica) from the southern basin of Caspian Sea

Abstract

Concentrations of cadmium, lead, and mercury were measured in different tissues (liver, muscle, and shell) of 60 Caspian Pond Turtles collected from Tajan and Shiroud Rivers, southern basin of the Caspian Sea. Based on the results, different tissues showed different capacities for accumulating trace elements. The general trend of metals accumulation was: liver > shell > muscle. Results also showed that accumulation of these elements was not significantly different between sex and river in turtles (p > 0.05). Based on the results, Hg and Pb concentrations recorded in the present study were higher than some of the maximum concentration permissible. To our knowledge, this is the first report into heavy metal accumulation in tissues and organs of Caspian Pond Turtle from the southern basin of Caspian Sea. Further studies are needed to measure different heavy metals and trace metals in this valuable species.

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Acknowledgments

This study was supported by Caspian Sea Ecology Research Center and Chamran University. The authors wish to thank Mr. Ahmad Nosrati Movafagh for his kind assistance.

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Correspondence to Milad Adel.

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Responsible editor: Philippe Garrigues

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Adel, M., Saravi, H.N., Dadar, M. et al. Mercury, lead, and cadmium in tissues of the Caspian Pond Turtle (Mauremys caspica) from the southern basin of Caspian Sea. Environ Sci Pollut Res 24, 3244–3250 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-015-5905-5

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Keyword

  • Caspian Pond Turtle
  • Mauremys caspica
  • Heavy metal
  • Tissues
  • Sex
  • Caspian Sea