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Environmental Science and Pollution Research

, Volume 22, Issue 1, pp 358–368 | Cite as

Association between particulate matter and its chemical constituents of urban air pollution and daily mortality or morbidity in Beijing City

  • Pei Li
  • Jinyuan XinEmail author
  • Yuesi Wang
  • Guoxing Li
  • Xiaochuan Pan
  • Shigong Wang
  • Mengtian Cheng
  • Tianxue Wen
  • Guangcheng Wang
  • Zirui Liu
Research Article

Abstract

Recent time series studies have indicated that daily mortality and morbidity are associated with particulate matters. However, about the relative effects and its seasonal patterns of fine particulate matter constituents is particularly limited in developing Asian countries. In this study, we examined the role of particulate matters and its key chemical components of fine particles on both mortality and morbidity in Beijing. We applied several overdispersed Poisson generalized nonlinear models, adjusting for time, day of week, holiday, temperature, and relative humidity, to investigate the association between risk of mortality or morbidity and particulate matters and its constituents in Beijing, China, for January 2005 through December 2009. Particles and several constituents were associated with multiple mortality or morbidity categories, especially on respiratory health. For a 3-day lag, the nonaccident mortality increased by 1.52, 0.19, 1.03, 0.56, 0.42, and 0.32 % for particulate matter (PM)2.5, PM10, K+, SO4 2−, Ca2+, and NO3 based on interquartile ranges of 36.00, 64.00, 0.41, 8.75, 1.43, and 2.24 μg/m3, respectively. The estimates of short-term effects for PM2.5 and its components in the cold season were 1 ~ 6 times higher than that in the full year on these health outcomes. Most of components had stronger adverse effects on human health in the heavy PM2.5 mass concentrations, especially for K+, NO3 , and SO4 2−. This analysis added to the growing body of evidence linking PM2.5 with mortality or morbidity and indicated that excess risks may vary among specific PM2.5 components. Combustion-related products, traffic sources, vegetative burning, and crustal component and resuspended road dust may play a key role in the associations between air pollution and public health in Beijing.

Keywords

Air pollution Chemical constituents Mortality Morbidity Particulate matter PM2.5 Time series Beijing 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank Yang Sun, Dongshen Ji, Guiqian Tang, Lili Wang, and employees of IAP, CAS for their assistance with various aspects of data collection and data preparation. This work is partially supported by the CAS Strategic Priority Research Program Grant No. XDA05100100, the public project of the Beijing Municipal Science and Technology Commission (D09040903670902), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41021004, 41075103), the Research Subject of State Science and Technology Support Program of China (2012BAJ18B08), the Gong-Yi Program of China Meteorological Administration (GYHY201106034), and the “Meteorological Environment and Health” Special Service Program of National Population and Health Science Data Sharing Platform.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pei Li
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Jinyuan Xin
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yuesi Wang
    • 1
  • Guoxing Li
    • 4
  • Xiaochuan Pan
    • 4
  • Shigong Wang
    • 2
  • Mengtian Cheng
    • 1
  • Tianxue Wen
    • 1
  • Guangcheng Wang
    • 3
  • Zirui Liu
    • 1
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry, Institute of Atmospheric PhysicsChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina
  2. 2.Key Laboratory of Semi-Arid Climate Change of Ministry of Education, College of Atmospheric ScienceLanzhou UniversityLanzhouChina
  3. 3.Unit 93501 of PLABeijingChina
  4. 4.Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public HealthPeking University Health Science CenterBeijingChina

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