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Enhanced removal of arsenic from a highly laden industrial effluent using a combined coprecipitation/nano-adsorption process

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Abstract

Effective arsenic removal from highly laden industrial wastewater is an important but challenging task. Here, a combined coprecipitation/nano-adsorption process, with ferric chloride and calcium chloride as coprecipitation agents and polymer-based nanocomposite as selective adsorbent, has been validated for arsenic removal from tungsten-smelting wastewater. On the basis of operating optimization, a binary FeCl3 (520 mg/L)–CaCl2 (300 mg/L) coprecipitation agent could remove more than 93 % arsenic from the wastewater. The resulting precipitate has proved environmental safety based on leaching toxicity test. Fixed-bed column packed with zirconium or ferric-oxide-loaded nanocomposite was employed for further elimination of arsenic in coprecipitated effluent, resulting in a significant decrease of arsenic (from 0.96 to less than 0.5 mg/L). The working capacity of zirconium-loaded nanocomposite was 220 bed volumes per run, much higher than that of ferric-loaded nanocomposite (40 bed volumes per run). The exhausted zirconium-loaded nanocomposite could be efficiently in situ regenerated with a binary NaOH–NaCl solution for reuse without any significant capacity loss. The results validated the combinational coprecipitation/nano-adsorption process to be a potential alternative for effective arsenic removal from highly laden industrial effluent.

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Acknowledgment

The study was financially supported by the Jiangsu NSF (BK2012017), NSFC (21177059), and Changjiang Scholars Innovative Research Team in University (IRT1019).

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Correspondence to Ming Hua.

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Responsible editor: Angeles Blanco

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Jiang, Y., Hua, M., Wu, B. et al. Enhanced removal of arsenic from a highly laden industrial effluent using a combined coprecipitation/nano-adsorption process. Environ Sci Pollut Res 21, 6729–6735 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-014-2590-8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-014-2590-8

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