Advertisement

Mechanistic effect models for ecological risk assessment of chemicals (MEMoRisk)—a new SETAC-Europe Advisory Group

  • Thomas G. Preuss
  • Udo Hommen
  • Anne Alix
  • Roman Ashauer
  • Paul van den Brink
  • Peter Chapman
  • Virginie Ducrot
  • Valery Forbes
  • Volker Grimm
  • Dieter Schäfer
  • Franz Streissl
  • Pernille Thorbek
MEMORISK • SETAC EUROPE ADVISORY GROUP

Background

Mechanistic effect models have been applied to ecotoxicological questions for over 25 years (e.g. O'Neill et al. 1982; Kooijman and Metz 1984; Pastorok et al. 2003), but their use in regulatory risk assessment has been very limited so far. Recently, the value of models in support of regulatory ecological risk assessments is being recognised. Thus, such models were mentioned as valuable higher tier tools in several recent expert workshops on risk assessment of pesticides under the European Directive 91/414, i.e. the SETAC workshops AMPERE on mesocosm tests (Alix et al. 2007) and AMRAP on macrophyte testing (Maltby et al. 2009). The ELINK workshop focussed on how to extrapolate from the usually simple exposure patterns in ecotoxicological test systems to the complex exposure scenarios predicted by the exposure models that are used in risk assessments, and different types of effect models were discussed for the potential use to solve this problem (Hommen et al. 2009). Finally,...

Keywords

Advisory Group Ecological Risk Assessment Species Sensitivity Distribution Biotic Ligand Model Dynamic Energy Budget 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Alix A, Heimbach F, Liess M, Maltby L, Maund S, Wogram J (eds) (2007) Aquatic Mesocosms in Pesticide Registration in Europe: Recent Experiences (AMPERE). Summary of the AMPERE workshop in Leipzig, Germany, 24–25 April 2007. http://www.systemecology.eu/AMPERE/Summary_files/AMPERE_summary.pdf
  2. Forbes VE, Hommen U, Thorbek T, Heimbach F, van den Brink PJ, Wogram J, Thulke HH, Grimm V (2009) Ecological models in support of regulatory risk assessments of pesticides: developing a strategy for the Future. Integrated Environ Assess Manag 5(1):167–172CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Galic N, Van den Brink PJ, Baveco H, Hommen U, Schaefers C (2008) Do existing population models meet the needs of current risk assessment schemes for pesticides and biocides? Abstract. SETAC Europe 18th Annual Meeting, Warsaw, Poland, 25-29.05.2008Google Scholar
  4. Grimm V, Thorbek P, Schmolke A, Chapman P (2009) State-of-the-art of ecological modelling for pesticide risk assessment: a critical review. In: Thorbek P, Forbes V, Heimbach F, Hommen U, Thulke HH, van den Brink P, Wogram J, Grimm V (eds) Ecological models in support of regulatory risk assessments of pesticides: developing a strategy for the future. SETAC, Pensacola (in press)Google Scholar
  5. Hommen U, Ashauer R, van den Brink P, Caquet T, Ducrot V, Lagadic L, Ratte HT (2009) Extrapolation methods in aquatic effect assessment of time variable exposure to pesticides. In: Brock TCM, Alix A, Brown CD, Capri E, Gottesbüren BFF, Heimbach F, Lythgo CM, Schulz R, Streloke M (eds) Linking aquatic exposure and effects in the risk assessment of plant protection products. Guidance from the SETAC Europe Workshop ELINK (Bari, Italy and Wageningen, The Netherlands, March and September 2007). SETAC (in press)Google Scholar
  6. Kooijman SALM, Metz JAJ (1984) On the dynamics of chemically stressed populations: the deduction of population consequences from effects on individuals. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf 8:254–274CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Maltby L, Arnold D, Arts G, Davies J, Heimbach F, Pickl C, Poulsen V (eds) (2009) Aquatic macrophyte risk assessment for pesticides (AMRAP). Guidance from the AMRAP workshop in Wageningen, The Netherlands, January 2008. SETAC (in press)Google Scholar
  8. O'Neill RV, Gardner RH, Barnthouse LW, Suter GW, Hildebrand SG, Gehr CW (1982) Ecosystem risk analysis: a new methodology. Environ Toxicol Chem 1(2):167–177CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Pastorok RA, Akcakaya HR, Regan H, Ferson S, Bartell SM (2003) Role of ecological modeling in risk assessment. Hum Ecol Risk Assess 9(4):939–972CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Thorbek P, Forbes VE, Heimbach F, Hommen U, Thulke HH, van den Brink PJ, Wogram J, Grimm V (eds) (2009) Ecological models in support of regulatory risk assessments of pesticides: developing a strategy for the future. Report of the SETAC-Europe LEMTOX workshop, Leipzig, Germany, September 2007. SETAC, Pensacola (in press)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas G. Preuss
    • 1
  • Udo Hommen
    • 2
  • Anne Alix
    • 3
  • Roman Ashauer
    • 4
  • Paul van den Brink
    • 5
  • Peter Chapman
    • 6
  • Virginie Ducrot
    • 7
  • Valery Forbes
    • 8
  • Volker Grimm
    • 9
  • Dieter Schäfer
    • 10
  • Franz Streissl
    • 11
  • Pernille Thorbek
    • 12
  1. 1.Institute for Environmental ResearchRWTH Aachen UniversityAachenGermany
  2. 2.Fraunhofer IMESchmallenbergGermany
  3. 3.AFFSA, Direction du Végétal et de l’Environnement (Plant and Environment Directorate)Maisons AlfortFrance
  4. 4.EawagDübendorfSwitzerland
  5. 5.AlterraWageningen University and Research CentreWageningenThe Netherlands
  6. 6.Unilever—Safety & Environmental Assurance CentreUnilever HouseLondonUK
  7. 7.INRA, Agrocampus Ouest, UMR985 Ecologie et Santé des Ecosystèmes, Équipe Écotoxicologie et Qualité des Milieux AquatiquesRennesFrance
  8. 8.Center for Integrated Population EcologyRoskilde UniversityRoskildeDenmark
  9. 9.Department of Ecological ModellingUFZ, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research—UFZLeipzigGermany
  10. 10.Bayer CropScience, Environmental SafetyMonheimGermany
  11. 11.EFSA (European Food Safety Authority)Pesticide Risk Assessment Peer Review (PRAPeR)ParmaItaly
  12. 12.Syngenta, Environmental Safety, Jealott’s Hill, International Research CentreBracknellUK

Personalised recommendations